dim

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dim bulb

An unintelligent or slow-witted person. I explained this to you not once, but three times! Are you just a dim bulb, or what?
See also: bulb, dim

dim down

To lessen something in brightness, as of a light. A noun or pronoun can be used between "dim" and "down." I dimmed down the lights so that we could have a romantic candlelit dinner. We knew that the play was about to start once the lights dimmed down.
See also: dim, down

dim out

To darken completely after a period of dimming. We were all disappointed when the lights dimmed out in the middle of our party.
See also: dim, out

dim up

To cause dim lights to become brighter. We knew that the band wasn't going to play another encore when the lights in the arena dimmed up.
See also: dim, up

take a dim view (of someone or something)

To view (something) unfavorably; to disapprove (of something). I'm afraid the administration is taking a dim view of that legislation, so it will most likely get vetoed. Even though you might think it's a minor offense, the authorities still take a dim view. So far the boss has taken a dim view of the new intern.
See also: dim, someone, take, view

the (dim and) distant past

A time long ago in the past. It's easy to forget that, in the dim and distant past, these giant cities used to be nothing but fields and marshes. He's just a washed-up old drunk now, but he used to be a huge star in the distant past.
See also: distant, past

take a poor view of (someone or something)

To view someone or something unfavorably; to disapprove of someone or something. I'm afraid the administration is taking a poor view of that legislation, so it will most likely get vetoed. The authorities take a poor view of any kind of fraud, even what you might think is a minor offense. So far the boss has taken a poor view of the new intern.
See also: of, poor, take, view

dimwit

One who is stupid or foolish. Geez, he keeps pulling on a door that's clearly marked "push"—what a dimwit.

dim down

[for the lights] to go dim. The lights dimmed down for a few seconds. Open the stage curtain when the house lights dim down.
See also: dim, down

dim out

[for a light] to grow dim and go out altogether. The lights dimmed out twice during the storm. I was afraid that the lights would dim out completely.
See also: dim, out

dim something down

to make lights dim; to use a dimmer to make the lights dimmer. Why don't you dim the lights down and put on some music? Let me dim down the lights and put on some music.
See also: dim, down

dim something up

to use a dimmer to make the lights brighter. (Theatrical. A dimmer is a rheostat, variable transformer, or something similar. The expression, a seeming contradiction, is the opposite of dim something down.) As the curtain rose, the electrician dimmed the lights up on a beautiful scene. You dimmed up the lights too fast.
See also: dim, up

take a dim view of someone or something

to disapprove of someone or something. Of all the boys, the teacher likes Dave the least. She takes a dim view of him. I take a dim view of that law.
See also: dim, of, take, view

take a dim view of

Regard disapprovingly, as in I take a dim view of meeting every single week. This idiom, which uses dim in the sense of "unfavorable," was first recorded in 1947
See also: dim, of, take, view

take a dim view of something

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

take a poor view of something

BRITISH
COMMON If you take a dim view of something or take a poor view of it, you disapprove of it. The French take a dim view of anyone who only has a snack at lunchtime. Fellow critics took a poor view of a critic who reviewed Paramount films and accepted a fee from the studio.
See also: dim, of, something, take, view

take a dim (or poor) view of

regard someone or something with disapproval.
1996 C. J. Stone Fierce Dancing He says that…the Home Office…take a dim view of lifers talking to the press.
See also: dim, of, take, view

take a dim/poor ˈview of somebody/something

disagree with or dislike somebody/something: Farmers tend to take a dim view of the public walking over their land.The judge said he took a very poor view of their behaviour.

dim

n. the evening; the night. (Streets.) Where’ll you be this dim?

dim bulb

n. a dull person; a stupid person. George seems to be a dim bulb, but he’s a straight-A student.
See also: bulb, dim

dimwit

(ˈdɪmwɪt)
n. an oaf; a dullard. (Also a rude term of address.) Oh, Dave, you can be such a dimwit!

take a dim view of, to

To disapprove. Today dim is only rarely used in the sense of “unfavorable,” as it is here. This metaphor dates from the mid-twentieth century. H. Grieve used it in Something in Country Air (1947): “Mr. Everard took a dim view of his youngest niece.”
See also: dim, take, view
References in periodicals archive ?
Only the dimmest would actually send an email from their regular address.
Even the dimmest among us can improve mental agility with computer-based brain teasers, a study has shown.
But that extra time to continue a war that never should have been started will come at a high cost in American lives, with only the dimmest prospect of success.
Some years ago during an interview with a Fortune 50 company, the interviewer said, "And of course, you can write a business case." I had only the dimmest idea of what that meant!
Before March ends, Nintendo will send Diddy Kong(R) racing, obscure Wario(TM) in a series of disguises, challenge you to pimp your robo and lure the most daring into the dimmest room at Hotel Dusk(TM).
After the 40,000 crowd at the arena stadium even the most dimmest official at the Department of Transport may have wondered how did they arrive and how did they leave.
Don't miss his weekly feature where Mark provides a skewering to some of the left's dimmest bulbs, and the absurd statements they make.
In the dimmest prehistory, humans learned to domesticate certain plants and animals leading to an agricultural revolution.
They put the two dimmest girls in that bed-sit and let them see what the others were up to, altering the dynamics of the show.
Even the dimmest market-followers could see what was happening, and supported him down to even money, and, by the final on July 25, to a virtually unbackable 1-12.
It's not too often I find myself in total agreement with Ken Bates, though any guy who can pocket pounds 17 million by selling his club and still remain chairman isn't the dimmest bulb in the chandelier.
His smile can peel back the layers of the dimmest mood and rarely leaves his face.
The chapter on Mendelsohn's Schocken department store in Stuttgart should impress the fact on even the dimmest reader that its architect's reputation has been suppressed largely because of the actions of the Nazis.
Even the dimmest lights among us can benefit from this step-by-step overview.