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dyke

1. A derogatory and highly offensive term for a woman who is masculine in appearance and/or sensibility. Typically used of lesbians who exhibit such traits.
2. A reclaimed term (see Definition 1) used by homosexuals for a woman who is masculine in appearance and/or sensibility. Typically used of lesbians who exhibit such traits. Yeah, I'm a dyke who's attracted to femmes.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

dike

and dyke
n. a lesbian; a bulldiker. (Rude and derogatory.) Who’s the dike in the cowboy boots?

dyke

verb
See dike
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) official on Tuesday rejected claims that substandard materials were used in building a dike on a tributary of the Laoag River that collapsed a week after it was completed in July last year.
Local scour around the spur dike foundations failure spur dikes.
In the current work, flume experiments considering nonsubmerged spur dikes with ipsilateral and alternate layout were conducted firstly.
However, since the 1930s, trees have become established on the north and south dikes of the reservoir.
Afghans construct earthen dikes extending out into the river to divert water.
Offset dikes consist of a rock called quartz diorite that spread out from the Sudbury Basin like arteries.
When the dikes or other types of costal protection structures are long, a small improvement in the design could result in a significant amount of saving.
and Zhang, B., 1998, Uplift structure of the southern Kapuskasing zone from 2.45 Ga dike swarm displacement: Geology, v.
Five dikes in Pampanga, built to contain floodwaters and lahar discharged by Mt.
Seismic failure of river dikes and current trend of its rehabilitation in Japan are summarized.
"It's difficult to tell because at the moment we're looking at a series of dikes that are relatively narrow," he says.
From top to bottom, modern seafloor consists of a layer ofsediment, "pillow" lavas that have split onto the seafloor, dikes through which magma has risen and a layer of magma that had crystallized in the magma chamber beneath a spreading ridge.
The work, according to a press release issued by the agency, is being done to restore two earthen dams, or dikes, which were always intended to remain tree free.