dig down

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dig down

1. Literally, to dig a hole into something, such as the ground. I had to dig down and create holes in the soil before I could plant the flowers.
2. To spend one's money. We had to dig down after our construction budget ballooned beyond what we had planned.
See also: dig, down
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

dig down

 and dig deep 
1. . Lit. to excavate deeply. They are really having to dig deep to reach bedrock. We are not to the buried cable yet. We will have to dig down some more.
2. Fig. to be generous; to dig deep into one's pockets and come up with as much money as possible to donate to something. (As if digging into one's pocket.) Please dig down. We need every penny you can spare. Dig down deep. Give all you can.
See also: dig, down
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dig down

Pay with money from one's own pocket; be generous. For example, We've got to dig down deep to make the next payment. [Colloquial; c. 1940]
See also: dig, down
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A third of young Brits post pictures outside swanky hotels, while actually staying in cheaper digs down the road.
Many titles refer to the New Orleans and African heritage in which this music digs down its roots, but it is thoroughly contemporary music with no pastiche of the past going on, and it should have wide appeal..
Vernon's influence is felt in the layered textures on this disc, moving Edwards further from her roots in alt-country as she digs down into the cycle of emotions that result from a lost love.
You don't think they're just that bit peeved about my little digs down the years, do you?
No developer can build up before he digs down, and if that digging reveals anything of historic interest, a building programme can be held up for years.
In essence, the chamber is the traditional shoebox with a high ceiling; it digs down to the first basement level to give the interior increased height.