dig the dirt


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dig the dirt

To find negative information that has been concealed. Once I contact my usual sources at the tabloids, I should be able to dig the dirt up on that actress.
See also: dig, dirt

dig the dirt (or dig up dirt)

discover and reveal damaging information about someone. informal
Dirt is commonly used as a metaphor for unsavoury gossip or scandal, as in, for example, dish the dirt (see dish).
See also: dig, dirt
References in periodicals archive ?
We had thought sleaze was a Tory-only attribute but hardly a minute of the new government had gone by before a tabloid had managed to dig the dirt on one of the few truly powerful men in the new government.
United have denied any wrong- doing involving agents but claims that Magnier has employed private investigators to dig the dirt on Ferguson's business dealings and the recent negative publicity concerning the manager's son Jason,has left fans fearing the prospect of all-out conflict.
I think it would have been irresistible for the press to have these three girls or young women who are potentially out enjoying themselves not to follow us around and dig the dirt.
HILLARY CLINTON hired a private eye to dig the dirt on 14 women whom she believed her husband Bill had slept with, a new book claims.
And Sadie employs her regular private dick to dig the dirt on Kelly "The Bike" Windsor.
Mr Sarwar told BBC Radio's Today programme: "I think it was a conspiracy against me and there were people here in Glasgow before the General Election who were offering people tens of thousands of pounds to dig the dirt on me.
WHEN journalist Susie Helm got sick of life in the fast lane she decided to dig the dirt, rather than dish it.