for all (one's) (something)

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for all

1. To the degree or extent that; insofar as. We might as well have been educated by dogs for all the good their teaching did! For all I know, she could be living in Timbuktu by now!
2. In spite of; notwithstanding. For all our efforts to stop the bill, it still cleared both the House and the Senate with ease.
See also: all

for all (one's) (something)

In spite of the negative trait or issue the speaker is discussing. In this construction, the speaker indicates a specific person, followed by a problem or shortcoming they have experienced or exhibit. Yeah, she's not remotely punctual, and she gripes a lot, but for all her shortcomings, Elisa is a really great manager—her employees just love her. For all our difficulties buying a house, we still managed to get one that we absolutely love.
See also: all
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

for all someone's problems

in spite of a person's problems (as specified). For all her complaining, she still seems to be a happy person. For all my aches and pains, I'm still rather healthy.
See also: all, problem
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

for all

1. Also, for all that. In spite of, notwithstanding. For example, For all her protests she still loved the attention, or He's too old for the part but he did a good job for all that. [Early 1300s]
2. for all one cares or knows . So far as one knows; also, one doesn't really care or know. These phrases are employed like a negative. For example, He can buy ten houses for all I care, meaning one doesn't care at all, or For all I know she's gone to China, meaning one doesn't really know where she is. [Mid-1700s]
See also: all
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

for all —

in spite of —.
1989 Independent For all their cruel, corrupt and reckless vices, the Maharajahs were worshipped as gods by tens of thousands of their subjects.
See also: all
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
They had mild difficulty falling asleep, severe difficulty staying asleep, and mild early morning awakenings.
A 2 x 3 factorial design was set up, with two levels of task difficulty (high difficulty vs.
(14) The practice has attracted criticism mainly due to the nature of the testing and the difficulty of collecting robust evidence.
Children with ASD often have difficulty with changes in routine.
Seeing difficulty is the second most prevalent with 2.6%.
The report also states that 2% of the people had moderate to severe disability, at least some difficulty in one domain, while 1% or 6,609 persons experienced severe disability.
(The exception was that externalizing problems at ages 8-9 years did not appear to affect sleep at ages 10-11 years.) Though inconsistent, the results suggest that externalizing problems likely affect difficulty sleeping much more so than the other way around.
The reward upon overcoming the difficulty is not only the absence of the difficult circumstance, but also the development of the person's abilities (Brooker & Lawrence, 2012).
The majority of respondents also opined that students felt difficulty in producing sounds due to interference of mother tongue, students felt shy to give the answers of teacher's questions, and due to overcrowded class, students had difficulty to hear the voice of the teacher in classroom.
The 42 items used a six-point Likert-scale, from "strongly disagree" to "strongly agree." Items were structured so that the highest score (6) indicated the greatest difficulty with an aspect of writing and the lowest score (1) indicated the least difficulty.
Of those 15.7 million people, two-thirds said they had difficulty in walking or climbing.
They were also asked to assess the level of difficulty using the following designations: Junior High (JH), Senor High (SH), Undergraduate (UG), Graduate Student (GS), and/or Professional level (PR).
Controlling for known biases, we test for a new type of bias we refer to as "difficulty bias, " which reveals that athletes attempting more difficult routines receive higher execution scores, even when difficulty and execution are judged separately.