differ

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Related to differing: deferring

agree to differ

Of two parties, to mutually accept that they simply do not (and will not) share the same view on a particular issue, in the interest of moving past the issue or avoiding further confrontation. After their discussion about politics intensified, Fred and Sue had to agree to differ before it impacted their friendship. I'm sick of arguing with you, so let's just agree to differ and move on from this issue.
See also: agree, differ

beg to differ

To politely disagree with someone else. I'm sorry, headmaster, but I beg to differ. Students at this school should have more access to financial aid and scholarships, not less. He thinks that the evening was a disaster, but I beg to differ—I saw plenty of guests enjoying themselves!
See also: beg, differ

differ about (something)

1. To disagree about something. I'm sorry, but we just differ about that analysis—I don't see how you can interpret the text that way.
2. To argue or debate about something. If you two are going to differ about your interpretations of the text, can you at least take it outside?
See also: differ

differ from (someone or something)

To be unlike someone or something. Can you explain how this car differs from that one? This proposal barely differs from the original one at all!
See also: differ

differ in (something)

To have specific differences from someone or something else. I can tell the twins apart—they differ in that Jim has a birthmark on his cheek. This recipe differs from that one because it doesn't require eggs.
See also: differ

differ on (something)

1. To disagree about something. I'm sorry, but we just differ on that analysis—I don't see how you can interpret the text that way.
2. To argue or debate about something. If you two are going to differ on your interpretations of the text, can you at least take it outside?
See also: differ, on

differ with (someone) about (something)

1. To disagree about something. I'm sorry, but I differ with you about that analysis and don't see how you can interpret the text that way.
2. To argue or debate about something. If you two are going to differ with each other about your interpretations of the text, can you at least take it outside?
See also: differ

differ with (someone) on (something)

1. To disagree about something. I'm sorry, but I differ with you on that analysis and don't see how you can interpret the text that way.
2. To argue or debate about something. If you two are going to differ with each other on your interpretations of the text, can you at least take it outside?
See also: differ, on

tastes differ

Preferences, inclinations, and desires can vary widely between different people. It's true that tastes differ, but I've yet to meet someone who genuinely dislikes this movie and its sequel. A: "It just really aggravates me that Tom thinks the book is stupid." B: "Tastes differ, John. Just let it go."
See also: differ, taste
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

beg to differ (with someone)

Fig. to disagree with someone; to state one's disagreement with someone in a polite way. (Usually used in a statement made to the person being disagreed with.) I beg to differ with you, but you have stated everything exactly backwards. If I may beg to differ, you have not expressed my position as well as you seem to think.
See also: beg, differ

differ from something

[for something] to be different from something else. No, this one differs from the one you saw because it has a bigger handle. How does this one differ from that one?
See also: differ

differ in something

[for people or things] to be different in a specific way or in specific ways. They differ only in the color of their eyes and the size of their shoes. They differ in size and shape.
See also: differ

differ (with someone) about something

 and differ (with someone) on something 
1. [for someone] to disagree with someone about something. I must differ with you about that. We differ about that. I don't differ with you on that point.
2. [for someone] to argue with someone about something. Tom was differing with Terry rather loudly about which one of them was going to carry the flag. Let's stop differing with each other on these simple things!
See also: differ

Tastes differ.

Prov. Different people like different things. Fred: Bill always goes out with such stupid girls. I can't understand why. Alan: Tastes differ.
See also: differ, Taste
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

beg to differ

Disagree with someone, as in John told me Max was sure to win, but I beg to differ-I don't think he has a chance. This courteous formula for expressing disagreement echoes similar uses of beg in the sense of "ask," such as I beg your pardon, so used since about 1600. Also see excuse me.
See also: beg, differ
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

agree to differ

or

agree to disagree

If two people who are arguing about something agree to differ or agree to disagree, they decide to stop arguing because neither of them is going to change their opinion. I find some of his views very curious and we've agreed to differ on some things. You and I are going to have to agree to disagree on this issue.
See also: agree, differ
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

agree to differ

cease to argue about something because neither party will compromise or be persuaded.
See also: agree, differ
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

aˌgree to ˈdiffer

(of two or more people) allow each other to have different opinions about something, especially in order to avoid more argument: Our views on this matter are so different that we’ll just have to agree to differ.
See also: agree, differ

I beg to ˈdiffer

used to say politely that you do not agree with something that has just been said: I must beg to differ on this. I think you are quite mistaken.
See also: beg, differ
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

differ from

v.
To have qualities that are not the same as those of something else: My results differed from the results of everyone else who conducted the experiment. Sopranos differ from altos in having higher voices.
See also: differ
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

beg to differ

To disagree in a polite manner.
See also: beg, differ
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

beg to differ, I

I disagree. This polite conversational phrase uses beg in the sense of “ask” or “entreat,” much as it is in the stock locution “I beg your pardon” for “Excuse me.” This usage dates from the 1300s.
See also: beg
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Subsequently, Denison explained that the NUCC report has recommended that more dialogues between groups with differing opinions should take place.
* Differing perspectives on the problem often lead to adversarial relationships among the stakeholders.
Section 3, Career Counseling for Clients with Differing Abilities, presents a simple but effective model for describing levels of consumer ability related to the job placement process.
Differing entity classifications among the states might also affect the business entity owners' right to apportion and the ability to avoid sales being thrown back to a particular state.
His readings do not attempt to displace the many admirable theological investigations undertaken by such scholars as Kaske, Tuve, Hume, and others; they suggest instead that the "differing possibilities made available by the variation within Elizabethan Protestant theology allow for differing perceptions to arise from the same data" (169).
The council called for temperate dialogue among them rather than the "my way or no way" shouting that sometimes marks exchanges between the differing parties.
To argue that climate originally influenced the biological development of differing skin tones and behaviors among human beings (hardly a controversial position today) is obviously not to argue that the resulting differences are purely cultural.
The differing modes are achieved by varying the volume of oil that is available for each function.
CONCEALED and differing site conditions encountered both above and below ground during the construction process pose liability concerns and precautions for design professionals.
While he notes that different people will approach the situation with differing perceptions, beliefs and values, he does not delineate what idiosyncratic characteristics of Bush led him to dictate the type of group dynamics present or his reliance on analogy.
As with many types of insurance coverage, there are subtle and not so subtle differing terms and conditions.
At that meeting, lengthy--often intense--discussions of forest principles reflected the differing perspectives of North and South.
13 Although all the reasons for these differing usage patterns are not clear, they may reflect differences in loan product recommendations made by real estate agents, self steering by loan applicants, or differences in marketing efforts by lenders.14
Mathematicians Andrew Granville of the University of Montreal and Kannan Soundararajan of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor discovered the error in Goldston and Yildirim's work after realizing, to their surprise, that they could adapt the new result to prove in just a few additional lines that there are infinitely many pairs of primes differing by 12 or less--a finding almost as strong as the elusive twin-primes conjecture.
tuberculosis transmission among patients whose isolates have similar but not identical DNA fingerprint patterns (i.e., differing by a single band) has not been well documented.