diet

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Related to dieting: Healthy eating

chameleon diet

obsolete A scant diet. If this poor harvest continues, all of us will have a chameleon diet come winter.
See also: diet

go on a diet

To begin a specific nutritional plan typically consisting of eating smaller amounts of food, eating (or avoiding) particular foods, or both in an attempt to lose weight or achieve some other health benefit. I think I need to go one a diet—I'm actually having trouble going up and down the stairs without losing my breath! My doctor suggested I go on a diet rich in red meat and leafy greens for a month to try to bolster my iron levels.
See also: diet, go, on

on a diet

Participating in a specific nutritional plan typically consisting of eating smaller amounts of food, eating (or avoiding) particular foods, or both in an attempt to lose weight or achieve some other health benefit. A: "Would you like some of my lemon meringue pie?" B: "No, thank you. I'm on a diet." My doctor put me on a diet of nothing but fruits, vegetables, and nuts.
See also: diet, on

paleo diet

A diet that typically consists of meat, fruit, vegetables, and nuts. "Paleo" is a shortening of "Paleolithic," referring to foods that are thought to have been available to be consumed by humans in the Paleolithic period (or "Stone Age"). Derek's on the paleo diet, so he literally never eats bread.
See also: diet, paleo

put (one) on a diet

To instruct or direct one to begin a specific nutritional plan typically consisting of eating smaller amounts of food, eating (or avoiding) particular foods, or both in an attempt to lose weight or achieve some other health benefit. My doctor put me on a diet rich in red meat and leafy greens for a month to try to bolster my iron levels. I had to put my dog on a diet because it was actually having trouble going up and down the stairs.
See also: diet, on, put
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

*on a diet

trying to lose weight by eating less food or specific foods. (*Typically: be ~; go ~; put someone ~; stay ~.) I didn't eat any cake because I'm on a diet. I'm getting too heavy. I'll have to go on a diet. I have a lot of trouble staying on a diet.
See also: diet, on
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
List and his collaborators used mice to test whether weight fluctuation due to yo-yo dieting is as unhealthy as lifelong obesity.
One is that different people gain weight in different ways: slowly, quickly, as adults, as children, from over-eating, from under-exercising, from pregnancy, from yo-yo dieting. Over time, different weight gain patterns have different effects on metabolism.
"Quick fixes" are prevalent on the dieting landscape these days, Ms.
How ought Christians to go about understanding and celebrating this most sacred meal against the background of America's growing obsession with dieting as a means of personal salvation and the widening gaps between the tables of the rich and poor?
Toeing a hard line, PCRM insists no one should consider increasing their intake of such high-fat and cholesterol foods as eggs, cheese and butter, regardless of dieting theories.
Although proponents of the Atkins diet argue that low carbohydrate intake has specific metabolic effects, some researchers still hold that all dieting is basically a matter of eating less.
Department of Agriculture held a "Great Nutrition Debate" (it should have been called a "Great Dieting Debate," given that most of the speakers were diet-book authors, not nutrition experts).
Twenty-five years later, Brody is still 35 pounds lighter than when she gave up dieting. She is what Anne Fletcher would call a "master at weight control."
These and other recent findings challenge some popular notions about weight gain and dieting. New research also raises questions about hunger in the obese and offers evidence that high-protein diets may aid in weight loss.
That's what researchers at Rockefeller University found when they studied 41 men and women who had lost 15 to 64 pounds by dieting. In order to keep that weight off, the dieters had to eat 220 to 300 fewer calories a day than people who had always been at the lighter weight.(2)