diddle

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diddle (someone) out of (something)

slang To trick or deceive someone into relinquishing something. I can't believe that shady salesman diddled you out of hundreds of dollars.
See also: diddle, of, out

diddle with (something)

To fiddle or play with something. Quit diddling with your keys, will you? You're making me nervous!
See also: diddle

diddle someone out of something

to cheat someone into giving up something. The boys diddled the old man out of a few bucks. He was diddled out of his last dime.
See also: diddle, of, out

diddle something out of someone

Sl. to get something from someone by deception. We diddled about forty bucks out of the old lady who runs the candy shop. They diddled Larry's last dime out of him.
See also: diddle, of, out

diddle with something

to play with something; to toy with something. Here, don't diddle with that watch. Stop diddling with your nose, Jimmy!
See also: diddle

diddle

1. tv. to feel someone sexually. (see also feel someone up. Usually objectionable.) She moved her hand over, like she was going to diddle him, then she jabbed him in the crystals.
2. in. to masturbate [oneself]. (Usually objectionable.) Have you been diddling again?
3. tv. to masturbate someone else. (Akin to sense 1 Usually objectionable.) She diddled him since it was his birthday.
4. tv. to cheat someone. The shop owner diddled me out of ten bucks.
5. tv. & in. to copulate [with] someone. (Usually objectionable.) I’m tired of hearing who has diddled whom in Hollywood.

diddle something out of someone

tv. to get something from someone by deception. We diddled about forty bucks out of the old lady who runs the candy shop.
See also: diddle, of, out, someone, something

diddle with something

in. to play with something; to toy with something. Here, don’t diddle with that watch.
See also: diddle, something
References in periodicals archive ?
What distinguishes Poe from his sources is precisely this inclination to see diddling everywhere, this suspicion that all intersubjective relations are part of a great swindle.
A friend suggested that I experiment with a pencil but surely his diddling stick can't be anywhere near that big?
So if Benefits Minister Iain Duncan Smith wants to stamp out diddling, he should get down to the Houses of Parliament.
Three MPs accused of diddling their expenses have been granted legal aid to pay for their hotshot lawyers.
Menzies Campbell and Margaret Beckett, with their big red faces and their big brass necks, were rightly mauled by an unforgiving audience, reelin' and beelin' over them diddling their expenses.
Big name brands risk a backlash when they are identified as diddling the punter - especially at a time when people are shopping around to get the best value for money.
This time we're told they're diddling us out of pounds 500million by imposing over-the-top credit card charges.
OF course the Beeb shouldn't go around diddling viewers.
The company strenuously denies that it's been diddling the public but said yesterday that it expected the Office of Fair Trading to rule against it.
The Russian authorities want to bring him, and his pal Yuli Dubov, who was also arrested on Monday, to trial for allegedly diddling the government of the Samara region of 60billion roubles when they ran the Logovaz car company.
Be it a multi-billion-pound corporation diddling the public or a ruthless back-street shark trying to siphon off your savings, we've exposed them all.