diddle

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diddle

obsolete Gin. None of that diddle for me, barkeep. I'm strictly a scotch man.

diddle (someone) out of (something)

slang To trick or deceive someone into relinquishing something. I can't believe that shady salesman diddled you out of hundreds of dollars.
See also: diddle, of, out

diddle for middle

slang Whoever throws a dart closest to the bull's-eye (the exact center of the dart board) gets to go first in a game of darts. A less common variant of "middle for diddle." Primarily heard in UK. A: "Who's up for some darts, lads?" B: "Cor, I thought you'd never ask. Right, diddle for middle!"
See also: diddle, for, middle

diddle with (something)

To fiddle or play with something. Quit diddling with your keys, will you? You're making me nervous!
See also: diddle

middle for diddle

slang Whoever throws a dart closest to the bull's-eye (the exact center of the dart board) gets to go first in a game of darts. Primarily heard in UK. A: "Who's up for some darts, lads?" B: "Cor, I thought you'd never ask. Right, middle for diddle!"
See also: diddle, for, middle
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

diddle someone out of something

to cheat someone into giving up something. The boys diddled the old man out of a few bucks. He was diddled out of his last dime.
See also: diddle, of, out

diddle something out of someone

Sl. to get something from someone by deception. We diddled about forty bucks out of the old lady who runs the candy shop. They diddled Larry's last dime out of him.
See also: diddle, of, out

diddle with something

to play with something; to toy with something. Here, don't diddle with that watch. Stop diddling with your nose, Jimmy!
See also: diddle
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

diddle

1. tv. to feel someone sexually. (see also feel someone up. Usually objectionable.) She moved her hand over, like she was going to diddle him, then she jabbed him in the crystals.
2. in. to masturbate [oneself]. (Usually objectionable.) Have you been diddling again?
3. tv. to masturbate someone else. (Akin to sense 1 Usually objectionable.) She diddled him since it was his birthday.
4. tv. to cheat someone. The shop owner diddled me out of ten bucks.
5. tv. & in. to copulate [with] someone. (Usually objectionable.) I’m tired of hearing who has diddled whom in Hollywood.

diddle something out of someone

tv. to get something from someone by deception. We diddled about forty bucks out of the old lady who runs the candy shop.
See also: diddle, of, out, someone, something

diddle with something

in. to play with something; to toy with something. Here, don’t diddle with that watch.
See also: diddle, something
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Specie Humbug, or the Autobiography of Ferret Snapp Newcraft, esq." was originally published in the May 1838 Democratic Review; later it was reprinted in the National Laborer, which ultimately reissued the story as a separate pamphlet.(6) Since it uses Kenney's terms without any explicit allusion to the original play or to Kenney himself, "Specie Humbug" provides further evidence for Reilly's claim about the prevalence of such terms as "diddling" and "raising the wind" in the popular press.
Significantly, both "Specie Humbug" and "Diddling" portray swindling as a rational practice: Newcraft calls raising the wind "the sublime science," and Poe classifies diddling as "one of the exact sciences." More importantly, both writers use the metaphor of swindling to describe the problems associated with an urbanizing society and an emerging capitalist economy.
Through such acts of conspicuous concealment, Poe's hoaxes and detective tales suggest that literature itself is the supreme form of diddling.
The film's central conceit - a Bill Gates-coded software tycoon engineers a series of high-profile superhacks to foment hysteria over the threat of information terrorists, then exploits this fear to sell his Gatekeeper security software to banks, multinational corporations, and the government, allowing him unlimited back-door access to the system - resonates with the current "convergence of the commercial and the military sectors" in the war against data diddling. In a twist on the classic bait-and-switch - a Red bait-and-switch, if you will - that metaphorical authority known somewhat quaintly as "The Man" morphs into The Back Door Man.
A friend suggested that I experiment with a pencil but surely his diddling stick can't be anywhere near that big?
Although I am relieved to say that I have neither examined nor measured your husband-to-be's diddling stick, and therefore cannot base this observation on any scientific data, the chances are that it will turn out to be rather shorter but considerable thicker than a pencil.
This time we're told they're diddling us out of pounds 500million by imposing over-the-top credit card charges.
OF course the Beeb shouldn't go around diddling viewers.
The company strenuously denies that it's been diddling the public but said yesterday that it expected the Office of Fair Trading to rule against it.
The Russian authorities want to bring him, and his pal Yuli Dubov, who was also arrested on Monday, to trial for allegedly diddling the government of the Samara region of 60billion roubles when they ran the Logovaz car company.
Be it a multi-billion-pound corporation diddling the public or a ruthless back-street shark trying to siphon off your savings, we've exposed them all.
So is the ingenuity of the mis- creants who figured out ways of diddling that much money out of the state.
While we would all readily agree that diddling the dole is something that must be stamped out, what about the fat cat fraudsters?