dictionary

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Related to dictionaries: encyclopedia

have swallowed a dictionary

To use an extensive vocabulary, especially by incorporating uncommon words into one's speech. That guy sounds like he's swallowed a dictionary—none of the kids can follow what he's saying.
See also: dictionary, have, swallow

a walking dictionary

A person who has a very large vocabulary or knows the definition of many words and who can recite them when asked. You should ask my brother what it means—he's a walking dictionary! Compared to most sixteen-year-olds, Sarah is a walking dictionary. She must read a lot in her spare time.
See also: dictionary, walking

a walking encyclopedia

A person who has a very large and detailed knowledge of a diverse array of facts and who can recite them when asked. Lily's like a walking encyclopedia when it comes to reptiles.

swallow the dictionary

To have and utilize a very extensive vocabulary; to use a variety of long, complicated, or uncommon words in one's speech. She must have swallowed a dictionary, because it was very hard to follow along with all the big words she was throwing around. Why do you always have to talk to use like you swallowed a dictionary?
See also: dictionary, swallow

a walking dictionary

or

a walking encyclopedia

If you describe someone as a walking dictionary or a walking encyclopedia, you mean that they know a lot of words or facts. She raised five of us on her own and she's a walking dictionary. He was a walking encyclopedia of music, full of wit and charm. Note: People sometimes use other words instead of dictionary or encyclopedia. He's a walking database on anything relating to insurance.
See also: dictionary, walking

have swallowed a dictionary

use long and obscure words when speaking. informal
See also: dictionary, have, swallow

a walking ˈdictionary, encycloˈpedia, etc.

(informal) used to describe a human or living example of the thing mentioned: Geoff is a walking encyclopedia. He knows about everything.She’s a walking dictionary (= she knows a lot of words).
See also: walking

swallow the dictionary

tv. to acquire an enormous vocabulary. (Usually in the past tense.) My uncle says I’ve swallowed the dictionary. That’s because I know so many big words.
See also: dictionary, swallow
References in periodicals archive ?
The Scots section changes gear somewhat with the discussion of the professional and scholarly dictionaries produced in the twentieth and now the twenty-first centuries.
The manner in which the Court uses dictionaries has changed over time as well.
The Oxford Global Languages has a special focus on those languages which we know are widely spoken but are digitally under-represented', explained Judy Pearsall, Director for Oxford Dictionaries.
Contemporary Kola Saami lexicography is represented by three bilingual dictionaries: two Saami-Russian dictionaries (CPC 1985; AHTOHOBa 2014), and a Saami-Russian and Russian-Saami dictionary (KepT 1986).
When training samples for each class are enough, test samples are locally coded into all class dictionaries. On the contrary, test samples are globally coded into total dictionary.
Keywords"Sparse Representation; KSVD; DWT; DCT;Over-complete Dictionaries; MOD
Power of learned dictionaries combined with Generic Multi-scale Representations, enables capturing of signals with intrinsic characteristics (Boaz Ophir, 2011).
The Supreme Court's use of dictionaries, virtually non-existent before 1987, has dramatically increased during the Rehnquist and Roberts Court eras to the point where as many as one-third of statutory decisions invoke dictionary definitions.
. the word "pizzaiolo" - is not recognised by the Collins or Chambers dictionaries bers dictionaries .
The Intergovernmental Foundation for Educational, Scientific and Cultural Cooperation (IFESCCO) supported by Commonwealth of Independent States implements electronic dictionaries of state CIS and languages which will appear in spring, 2013.
It was the Chinese, more than two millennia ago, who were the first to compile dictionaries.
ERIC Descriptors: High School Students; Deafness; Dictionaries; Vocabulary Development; English; Electronic Publishing; American Sign Language; Monolingualism; Recall (Psychology)
Federal Street Press is justifiably acclaimed for publishing inexpensive dictionaries. They go to great pains every year to keep their titles fully up to date, economical, thoroughly 'user friendly', and imminently portable.
As it is nowadays the demand that dictionaries describe languages as they are spoken and not as they should be used, a corpus-based dictionary would suffice this need.