dick

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dick

1. n. a detective; a police officer. (Underworld. From detective.) Marlowe is a private dick who has to keep one step ahead of the cops.
2. n. the penis. (Usually objectionable. Currently the most publicly used word for this organ.) She told some dirty joke about a dick, but everybody just sat there and looked straight ahead.
3. n. a stupid person, usually a male. (Rude and derogatory.) What stupid dick put this thing here in the way?
4. n. nothing. (Usually objectionable.) The whole idea isn’t worth dick.
5. tv. & in. to copulate [with] a woman. (Usually objectionable.) If you think I’m going out with a guy who only wants to get me dicked, you’re crazy.
6. tv. to cheat or deceive someone. (see also fuck, hose, screw.) That salesman dicked me for ten extra bucks.
See:
References in classic literature ?
'Tut, man!' said Dick; 'you're not offended; you're a man of the world, I thought.
Van Tromp laughed gaily, shook hands up to the elbows, hoped cordially they would meet again and that often, but looked after Dick as he departed with a tremor of indignation.
For the first time in his life Whiskey Dick hesitated between two forms of intoxication.
The delicate compliment to their confidential relations and the slight stimulus of liquor had tremulously exalted Whiskey Dick. Affecting to look cautiously out of the window and around the room, he ventured to draw nearer the young woman with a half-paternal, half-timid familiarity.
But Whiskey Dick, guiltily attributing the movement to his own indiscreet gesture, said, "Excuse me, miss," recovered himself by lightly dusting her shoulder with his handkerchief, as if to remove the impression, and her smile returned.
'I should said it was,' replied Dick; 'unless the way in which I put the case to him, made an impression.
'He don't look like it,' said Dick shaking his head, 'but these old people--there's no trusting them, Fred.
'It seems improbable certainly,' said Dick, musing.
"Dick! you here?" he exclaimed, but with no great expression of surprise, after all.
"I have counted positively upon you, my dear Dick, and I have picked you out from all the rest."
"Let us discuss it, then, at breakfast, if you have no objections, my dear Dick."
She can't take Dick to church, of course--not that he ever troubled church much in his best days.
Dick, with a despondent look upon his papers, and with his hand among his hair again, 'that I never can get that quite right.
Dick, 'and when it flies high, it takes the facts a long way.
Dick - I ask because I don't know, aunt - is he at all out of his mind, then?' I stammered; for I felt I was on dangerous ground.