diamond

(redirected from diamonds)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

diamond in the rough

A person or thing with exceptional qualities or characteristics that cannot be seen from the surface. The new employee initially seemed to lack confidence, but after seeing how hard he works, we realized that he's a diamond in the rough and is really a great asset to the company.
See also: diamond, rough

rough diamond

Someone or something that is unrefined but has many exceptional aspects or underlying potential. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. The young actor was a rough diamond. With some training, she'd become a superstar.
See also: diamond, rough

diamond cut diamond

A situation in which two equally cunning or devious people spar or interact. Primarily heard in UK. It's always diamond cut diamond when those two schemers get together.
See also: cut, diamond

diamond in the rough

Fig. a person who has good qualities despite a rough exterior; a person with great potential. Sam looks a little scruffy, but he's a diamond in the rough. He's a diamond in the rough—a little hard to take at times, but very smart and helpful.
See also: diamond, rough

diamond in the rough

Also, a rough diamond. A person of exceptional character or potential but lacking polish and refinement. For example, Jack is intelligent and trustworthy but lacks manners-he's a diamond in the rough. [Early 1600s]
See also: diamond, rough

a rough diamond

mainly BRITISH or

a diamond in the rough

AMERICAN
1. If you call someone, especially a man a rough diamond, you admire their good qualities, even though they are not very polite or well-educated. Note: A rough diamond is a diamond that has not yet been cut and polished. Marden was the rough diamond of the three, feared for his ruthlessness but respected for his First World War Military Cross. I liked Neil Murphy, who is somewhat of a diamond in the rough.
2. If you call someone or something a rough diamond, you mean that they have talent or good qualities which are hidden or not well developed and could be developed more. Note: A rough diamond is a diamond that has not yet been cut and polished. British first novels are more likely to be rough diamonds, with flashes of inspiration in an imperfect whole. When I heard this lady sing, I ran to the theater, and I said, `Chick, I found myself a diamond in the rough.'
See also: diamond, rough

diamond cut diamond

a situation in which a sharp-witted or cunning person meets their match. British
1863 Charles Reade Hard Cash He felt…sure his employer would outwit him if he could; and resolved it should be diamond cut diamond.
See also: cut, diamond

a rough diamond

a person who has genuinely fine qualities but uncouth manners. informal
Literally, a rough diamond is a diamond before it has been cut and polished. A North American variant of this expression is a diamond in the rough .
See also: diamond, rough

a ˌrough ˈdiamond

(British English) (American English a ˌdiamond in the ˈrough) a person who has many good qualities even though they do not seem to be very polite, educated, etc: Don’t be put off by your first impressions — he’s something of a rough diamond.
A rough diamond is a diamond that has not yet been cut or polished.
See also: diamond, rough

diamond in the rough

n. a person who is wonderful despite a rough exterior; a person with great potential. He’s a diamond in the rough—a little hard to take at times, but okay mostly.
See also: diamond, rough

diamond in the rough

One having exceptionally good qualities or the potential for greatness but lacking polish and refinement.
See also: diamond, rough

diamond in the rough, a

An individual of intrinsic merit but uncultivated manners. The simile comes from mining, where the uncut, unpolished diamond resembles a hunk of worthless rock but may, after processing, be both beautiful and very valuable. John Fletcher’s 1624 play, AWife for a Month, has it, “She is very honest, and will be hard to cut as a rough diamond” (4.2).
See also: diamond

diamond in the rough

A basically admirable person who is full of potential, but lacks the social graces. The image is that of a raw gemstone that, once cut and polished, will shine.
See also: diamond, rough
References in periodicals archive ?
Malabar Gold & Diamonds, the leading jewellery retailer is ready to win the hearts of jewellery lovers with the 'Everyday Diamonds' collection showcasing a wide range of diamond jewellery at competitive prices.
In the wake of the latest Israeli massacres in Gaza, which Human Rights Watch said "may amount to war crimes" and called on the international community to "impose real costs for such blatant disregard for Palestinian lives" it is imperative that diamonds which generate revenue used to fund the Israeli military are banned.
Meanwhile, Christie's displayed the 163.41-carat emerald-cut diamond owned by the Geneva-based luxury jeweller, De Grisogono.
The type of diamonds prized for jewelry formed as early as 3.5 billion years ago.
Silver deals in rare gem stones: rubies, emeralds, sapphires and diamonds. In 2010, he donated the Cullinan Blue Diamond necklace to the Smithsonian.
The rough diamond was purchased, through a competitive tender organised by Petra Diamonds Ltd., by New York-based Cora International.
Cullinan is renowned as a source of large diamonds and frequently yields diamonds larger than 10 carats.
Classic Diamonds, Vyse Street, Hockley (www.diamond-classics.com) A family owned business, Classic Diamonds has been around for 50 years and specialises in the manufacture of diamond set jewellery and certified diamond rings.
Visit Devji and learn more about diamonds and its transparent pricing policy.
According to Jossa, diamonds are a true rarity that offer a high return on investment - they're getting rarer by the day and it's a total misconception that there are piles of diamonds throughout the world and that they have no intrinsic value.
Other stolen items include a gold band with heart shaped amethyst and diamond ring worth pounds 25, a diamond-shaped ruby and diamond ring on a gold band worth pounds 350 and a gold band with sapphire and diamond eternity ring worth pounds 100.
Diamonds are rare and symbolic, synonymous with romance, wealth and glamour - a fragment of eternity with a personal value far exceeding its price tag.
When a Bhopal- based diamond merchant was asked if he had ever handled a 34.47 carat diamond, he queried incredulously if he was being asked about one diamond or several pieces of diamonds.
Marilyn Monroe famously sang "Diamonds are a girl's best friend", but in reality they have proved to be a very good friend to wealthy investors.