devote


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devote to (someone or something)

1. To commit or dedicate oneself to someone or something. In this usage, a reflexive pronoun is used between "devote" and "to." Because I have completely devoted myself to my family, I refuse to relocate for work and upend their lives. Unfortunately, Molly seems to have devoted herself to a dubious nonprofit organization.
2. To allocate or earmark someone or something for someone or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "devote" and "to." This week, I'm devoting all of my free time to finishing my term paper. All of the interns have been devoted to our mailing, so it shouldn't take too long to finish.
3. To dedicate a religious or other solemn occasion to someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "devote" and "to." Today's prayer service is devoted to people in war-torn countries around the globe.
See also: devote

devote oneself to someone or something

to dedicate or give oneself over to someone or something. Do you agree to devote yourself to this task? She devoted herself to raising her children.
See also: devote

devote someone or something to someone or something

to dedicate someone or something to the use or benefit of someone or something. I will devote a few of my people to your project. Sarah devoted all of her time to Roger.
See also: devote

devote to

v.
1. To commit someone or something to some task: She devoted herself to finishing the project. Don't devote all your time to that one project. I'm devoted to finishing this book by Friday.
2. To commit someone loyally to someone or something: She devoted herself to her family. He was entirely devoted to his parents.
3. To set something apart for a specific purpose or use: I'm devoting Saturday to cleaning the house. This knife is devoted to cutting cheese.
4. To set something apart by or as if by a vow or solemn act; consecrate something: The priest devoted the Mass to the veterans in the parish.
See also: devote
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the company, the DEVOTE trial has been conducted in response to a Complete Response Letter received from the FDA in February 2013 requesting additional cardiovascular data from a dedicated cardiovascular outcomes trial before the review of the New Drug Applications for Tresiba and Ryzodeg 70/30 could be concluded.
For more specialized industries, audit committee members in particular often need to devote extra time to understanding the financial implications of a company's circumstances.
Giuliani, to approve the capital plan and devote dedicated financial resources to this and subsequent MTA capital programs.
Devote is napped to open his account in the Gosh Cosmetics Flat race, in which he'll be partnered by Nina Carberry.
Or should the questions be so esoteric that only those who devote nearly all their working hours to tax research could earn a passing grade?
Even with scholars like Claude Cahen, Eliyahu Ashtor, and Andrew Watson, who devote special attention to economic questions, a tendency to draw sweeping conclusions from quite limited data undermines the value of their work.
* They devote about 45% of their time to A&A, 38% to tax, 5% to consulting and 1% to personal financial planning.
Russell also stresses that the horoscope cast by an astrologer at Henry's birth shows that he was "predestined to devote himself both to making 'great and noble conquests and to the uncovering of secrets previously hidden from men'" [15].
The editors do devote segments of their short introductions to Las Casas's compilation of documents composed by Columbus and his summarized versions of some of them.
Iran devotes more of its wealth to energy subsidies than any other country, and only two other countries come even close to Iran.
What is new in Gough's account is the attention she devotes to this last figure, prompted in part by the sheer intelligence of his interventions during the INKhUK debates and in part by the novelty of his nine "Spatial Constructions" (note the overall rejection of the old term sculpture).
For example, the study devotes considerable space to a couple of unrepresentative schools as if they were characteristic of all charters, thereby ignoring the extraordinary diversity of a new world still searching for its identity.
Then there is Nick Chrisie-Blick, soft-spoken Brit, who devotes himself to "picking away at the threads of theories until he finds a detail that unravels the whole thing".
The first part begins with a regional survey roughly similar to that which concluded volume 1, although it devotes greater detail to Wales and Scotland.
In her best selling book Smart Moves: Why Learning is Not All in Your Head, Hannaford devotes several chapters to explaining "Brain Gym." In Smart Moves, Hannaford states that our bodies are very much a part of all our learning, and learning is not an isolated "brain" function.