devil to pay, the

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the devil to pay

A huge amount of trouble, typically as a result of some particular thing happening (or not). There'll be the devil to pay if they catch us sneaking out this late at night! I just worry that we'll have the devil to pay if he gets elected president.
See also: devil, pay

there will be the devil to pay

There will be a huge amount of trouble (if a particular thing does/does not happen or is/is not done). There'll be the devil to pay if they catch us sneaking out this late at night! If you don't have that report finished by lunch, there will be the devil to pay!
See also: devil, pay, there, will

devil to pay, the

Serious trouble resulting from some action, as in There'll be the devil to pay if you let that dog out. This expression originally referred to trouble resulting from making a bargain with the devil, but later was broadened to apply to any sort of problem. A variant, the devil to pay and no pitch hot, first recorded in 1865, gave rise to the theory that the expression was originally nautical, since pay also means "to waterproof a seam by caulking it with pitch," and no pitch hot meant it was a particularly difficult job, since cold pitch is hard to use. However, the original expression is much older and is the one that survives. [c. 1400]
See also: devil

the devil to pay

serious trouble to be expected.
This expression refers to the bargain formerly supposed to be made between magicians and the devil, the former receiving extraordinary powers or wealth in return for their souls.
See also: devil, pay

the devil to pay

Trouble to be faced as a result of an action: There'll be the devil to pay if you allow the piglets inside the house.
See also: devil, pay

devil to pay, the

Serious trouble, a mess. The expression originally referred to making a bargain with the devil, and the payment that eventually would be exacted. It first appeared in print about 1400: “Be it wer be at tome for ay, than her to serve the devil to pay” (Reliquiare Antiquae). This Faustian type of trouble was later lightened to mean any kind of problem (Jonathan Swift, Journal to Stella, 1711: “The Earl of Strafford is to go soon to Holland . . . and then there will be the devil and all to pay”). In the nineteenth century the expression was expanded to “the devil to pay and no pitch hot.” This form referred to “paying,” or caulking, a seam around a ship’s hull very near the waterline; it was called “the devil” because it was so difficult to reach. (See also between the devil and the deep blue sea.) Sir Walter Scott used it in The Pirate (1821): “If they hurt but one hair of Cleveland’s head, there will be the devil to pay and no pitch hot.”
See also: devil
References in classic literature ?
There'll be the perfect devil to pay," he said simply.
You'll wake the cook, and there'll be the devil to pay for me.
Then, there's the devil to pay among them, that's all
If I didn't there'd be the very devil to pay in blackmail.
We shall find yet there's the devil to pay when this is over," said Jukes, feeling very sore.
Even in the post Millennium Kim Simmons continues to tour and record, spitting out albums like Voodoo Moon, Going To The Delta, The Devil To Pay and this latest release Witchy Feelin'.
Consequently, the Iranian people will have the devil to pay, not forgetting the alone the sheer volume of corruption that has spread in that country.
It can finally all come together for Devil To Pay when he runs in the Riverside Caravan Park Handicap Chase at Stratford.
vvAlan King, the trainer of Label Des Obeaux, suffered more frustration half an hour later when Devil To Pay fell at the last in the 2m handicap chase, having traded at 1.
Over half a century ago, Grande sertao: veredas (1956) appeared in English translation as The Devil to Pay in the Backlands (1963).
So, the expectation is, when they do find out, therell be the devil to pay, because they will end up fighting over the same woman
The Prime Minister informed that at a meeting of July 9 gave time the Head of the State Fiscal Service up to 1 September: "There ll be the devil to pay when there are tax gaps.
The third and fourth chapters deal with an analysis of the primary sources themselves, that is to say the letters written by the Portuguese while in the New World: Pero Vaz de Caminha's letter to King Dom Manuel, Pero de Magalhaes de Gandavo's Historia da Provincia de Santa Cruz, letters by Jesuit priests, and Gabriel Soares de Sousa's Noticias do Brasil, also alongside canonic literary texts such as Camoes' epic poem The Lusiads, and Clarice Lispector's The Besieged City, or Guimaraes Rosa's The Devil to Pay in the Backlands which are referred to in the conclusion.
NNA - North Lebanon regions had the devil to pay with September's first rainfalls, as a number of roads were reportedly cut off and agro fields engulfed in surging floods.
Rustarix got him back on track on Friday while Devil To Pay scored yesterday.