develop

(redirected from developing)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to developing: thesaurus, Developing countries

develop from (someone or something)

To grow and change from someone or something into someone or something else. Thanks to her public speaking class, Alicia has developed from a painfully shy girl into a confident speaker. My craft business developed from a passion for knitting.
See also: develop

develop from (someone or something) into (someone or something)

To grow and change from one kind of person or thing into someone or something new or different. Thanks to her public speaking class, Alicia has developed from a painfully shy girl into a confident speaker. My craft business has developed from a passion for knitting into my full-time source of income.
See also: develop

develop into (someone or something)

To grow and change from one kind of person or thing into someone or something new or different. Thanks to her public speaking class, Alicia has developed into a confident speaker. My passion for knitting has developed into my full-time source of income.
See also: develop

develop into (someone or something) from (someone or something)

To grow and change from one kind of person or thing into someone or something new or different. It's wild that this fern developed into such a big plant from just a tiny little seed. I look back on old photos of Jeff, and I find it hard to believe that he developed into such a strong, athletic young man from the scrawny little boy he used to be.
See also: develop
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

develop from someone or something (into someone or something)

 and develop (from someone or something) into someone or something
to grow or evolve out of someone or something into someone or something else. Her interest in music developed from a childlike curiosity to a full-fledged professional career. The flower developed from a little knot of a bulb.
See also: develop
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
That is, the developed countries, instead of manufacturing products in their own countries, are outsourcing industrial products from developing countries.
A third emergent dimension in teacher reflections was a developing ability to find commonalities in thinking and to build upon personal understandings through the diversity in thinking others bring to sustained groups engaged in dialogue on personally directed research.
Omowunmi Sadik is developing a product that could eventually put drug- and bomb-sniffing dogs out of business.
Starting up halon banking systems is certainly in the best interest of developing world airlines.
In many developing and middle-income economies, the majority of output in services such as retail and construction comes from informal firms that neither pay full taxes, nor abide by worker safety and other regulations, nor even register.
In Maternal Mortality, a review of studies conducted by WHO from 1998 to 2003, Nasr Adbalia Mohamed lists the following major risk factors in developing countries for maternal deaths:
Unless HIV-infected children in the developing world are to remain therapeutic orphans forever, funders must consider setting aside resources specifically for the care and treatment of children.
Developing user-defined controlled vocabularies for subject access in a digital library.
GSK is committed to playing a leading role in addressing the healthcare crisis in the developing world.
These are just a few of the drills that we use to develop more bat speed and to continue developing a grooved swing that will allow the hitter to be more consistent at the plate.
In 2003, the Chief of Staff of the Army (CSA) directed that the Army shift its funding efforts from developing the Battle Command architecture from the bottom-up to one that is focused on developing the architecture from the top-down.
The purpose of this article is to offer a structure for conceptualizing advocacy and for developing advocacy competencies.
International price cartels cost developing countries at least $10-24 billion per year.
Under this approach, we would focus on developing technologies for systems that do not die under an attack and those that continue to operate through attacks.
Full browser ?