detract

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detract from (someone or something)

To impact someone or something negatively; to diminish someone or something. Unfortunately, that outdated kitchen detracts from the overall value of your house. His lies detracted from his otherwise stellar record as a senator.
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Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

detract from someone or something

to lessen or diminish someone or something. The large pieces of furniture detracted from the lovely design in the carpet. Alice's quiet demeanor did not detract from her grace and beauty.
See also: detract
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

detract from

v.
To reduce a quality, importance, or some other value; diminish something: The dent on the side of the car detracts from its overall value. The politician's uneven voting record detracted from his chances of winning the election.
See also: detract
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Had we continued to play on the Thursday and counted those scores, that would have detracted from it."
Andy Duncan, environmental programme officer for the city council, said: ``The run-down appearance of these sites detracts from major city centre investments nearby, such as Leisure World and Coventry University Technology Park.''
Excessively high ferrite content detracts from the yield strength.
and the sampling, but neither loss detracts from the popularity of his new recording, Too Legit To Quit (Capitol).
While her characters' voices are subtly different--there are no sharp differences between the genders, for example--this in no way detracts from her performance.
Together they reveal not only the artist's masterful visual sense and emphasis on female-centric images with a spiritual bent but also a recurrent theme of Christian ritual that never detracts from a notorious sense of serious play.
Walcott's scholarly acumen is apparent throughout the book, even while it detracts from what would otherwise be an enjoyable and enlightening read for the average black history buff.
There are those who insist that fighting for gay rights detracts from more "serious" issues, such as economic democracy.
Also, Bann's heavily-theoretical attention to minutiae often detracts from these intriguing details, as when he discusses the ideological import of orthographical changes to the Bargrave name, and the etymology of the family's country home ("Bifrons"), or his labored reading of the inscription on a family monument that the younger Bargrave placed in the parish church of Patrixbourne.
Her art defies description because the analysis of it detracts from its naturalness.
None of this detracts from their heroic acts during the Texas Revolution.
As is all too often the case, the carrot of interactivity here presages the visitor's childish but irresistible feeling of disappointment at the obvious limitations of the spectacle implied that detracts from any original or productive inquiry the work purports to embody.
While his position against binarism holds merit, the chapter chirps along so glibly at times that it detracts from the point (see 99).
The ungenerous format of the book also detracts from the pleasure of reading it.