deter (someone or something) from (something)

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deter (someone or something) from (something)

To cause or encourage someone not to do something. The threat of rain deterred us from going to the beach this weekend.
See also: deter

deter someone or something from something

to prevent or discourage someone or a group from doing something. We can't seem to deter them from leaving. They were not deterred from their foolish ways.
See also: deter
References in classic literature ?
At the same time he should encourage his citizens to practise their callings peaceably, both in commerce and agriculture, and in every other following, so that the one should not be deterred from improving his possessions for fear lest they be taken away from him or another from opening up trade for fear of taxes; but the prince ought to offer rewards to whoever wishes to do these things and designs in any way to honour his city or state.
No; I was not to be deterred from this brave life on the water by the fact that the water-dwellers had queer and expensive desires for beer and wine and whisky.
Speaking in the Afghan capital on Monday, Ban said the United Nations would not be deterred from its work in the war-torn nation by acts of violence.
That is not to say that the United States should stint on its efforts to prevent, deny, disrupt, or defeat; those are valuable capabilities in and of themselves, since some adversaries may not be dissuaded from acquiring or improving capabilities or deterred from using them.
While some students may indeed be deterred from using drugs, the conventional wisdom (supported by empirical data) is that students who participate in extracurricular activities are some of the least likely to use drugs.
The teen, who recently graduated from Placerita Junior High, said she has been deterred from drug activity because she has seen a relative serve jail time for his substance abuse.
The success of any sting operation often is measured by the number of potential offenders deterred from committing similar crimes because of the perceived chance for arrest.