despise

(redirected from despised)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

despise (one) for (something)

To hate one for a particular reason. Don't even mention Tiffany's name to me—I despise her for starting that rumor about me last year.
See also: despise

despise someone for something

to hate someone for something or for doing something. I just despise him for running away! She despised herself for her dishonest actions.
See also: despise
References in periodicals archive ?
Since She who must be despised is an attempt to x-ray contemporary Nigeria from the prism of the Book of Job, it is no surprise that it is a poetic drama.
In a second experiment, participants reported their willingness to purchase a sweater owned by someone famous (well-liked or despised).
They are in rebellion against God and men because of their status of being the rejected, the despised and the marginalized.
As he says: "Few people on this planet know what it is to be truly despised," and he's one of them.
The newfound manuscript says that Judas will be despised by the other disciples but will also be exalted over them for helping Jesus shed his bodily self and liberate his spiritual self.
Which king was so despised that his own people may have opened the city gates for invaders?--
When her body is discovered, there are a host of suspects who would have liked to kill Kiki from the chauffer who was used as a stud to the owner of the bridal store who hasn't been paid for the gowns, accessories and the daughter who despised her mother.
But, as with all despised relatives, one feels the business lobby has already judged the bus and found it wanting.
And they were roundly despised by the native Arab population.
But his reception was quite different: He was roundly dismissed, even despised, like the stuff of Pop itself.
"'Live it up' seems to be my motto for a while," Robbins writes in a journal, "while the other Jerry stands aghast while being raped, destroyed, defiled, and maligned." Robbins appears to have despised himself--that "other Jerry," ever so briefly a communist--for naming names to HUAC.
Politicians at home don't want to further embarrass an important Cold War ally, and Judge Dan Haywood (Spencer Tracy) is pressured to dismiss the charges against German jurist Ernst Janning (Butt Lancaster), who always despised the Nazis and allowed only a few injustices to be perpetrated against a handful of persons.
"Tan" is a very dark and therefore highly despised child born to Rozelle "Rosie" Quinn and Clarence Otis Yardley, or "Crow," a traveling man.
In 52:13-15, God declares that the servant "shall be exalted and lifted up," much to the surprise of those who despised him.
And his essay "Writing Robeson" is a fascinating analysis of the general problems of writing biography and the particular advantages he had as a gay person writing about an African American figure, since both "shared status as outsiders--outsiders who to a significant degree had been 'let in,' had been treated by the mainstream as an acceptable representative of an otherwise despised group." His essays on the unique problems faced by gay and lesbian movements are likewise fresh and engaging because they arise from an altogether independent consciousness which is also steeped in a complex and nuanced understanding of American political history.