desperate

(redirected from desperateness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

desperate diseases must have desperate remedies

proverb Extreme and undesirable circumstances or situations can only be resolved by resorting to equally extreme actions. I know that the austerity measures introduced by the government during the recession are unpopular, but desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.

desperate measures

Extreme and undesirable actions taken as a solution to a problem that cannot be resolved by ordinary means. With his job gone and debt mounting, John was forced to take desperate measures to keep his home.
See also: desperate, measure

desperate times call for desperate measures

proverb Extreme and undesirable circumstances or situations can only be resolved by resorting to equally extreme actions. Derived from the proverb, "Desperate diseases must have desperate remedies." I know that the austerity measures introduced by the government during the recession are unpopular, but desperate times call for desperate measures.

desperate times require desperate measures

proverb Extreme and undesirable circumstances or situations can only be resolved by resorting to equally extreme actions. Derived from the proverb, "Desperate diseases must have desperate remedies." I know that the austerity measures introduced by the government during the recession are unpopular, but desperate times require desperate measures.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.

Prov. If you have a seemingly insurmountable problem, you must do things you ordinarily would not do in order to solve it. Fred: All my employees have been surly and morose for months. How can I improve their morale? Alan: Why not give everyone a raise? Fred: That's a pretty extreme suggestion. Alan: Yes, but desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

desperate straits

A very difficult situation. The noun “strait,” usually in the plural (straits), has been used since the 1600s to mean a dilemma of some kind. One of the earliest pairings with “desperate” was in Harriet Martineau’s The History of England during the Thirty Years’ Peace (1849): “Never were Whig rulers reduced to more desperate straits.” Today the term is used both seriously and ironically, as in “We’re in desperate straits today—the newspaper never arrived.”
See also: desperate, strait
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Although it seems as though Millie is finally able to face up to the female part of Joss, Kay uses this situation to display Millie's desperateness to prove that even when Joss does 'female' things, there is an innate maleness to him.
It rests on her status as a mother of six (bearing too many children), her poverty, and the desperateness of her situation.
Does a lack of access to care (in a developing country, for instance) increase the desperateness of people to acquire data?
Nostromo, once proud of his desperateness but at last respectable with
Shaftab Khalid owes his meteoric elevation in part to his ability to bowl the off-spinner's 'wrong 'un' and England's desperateness to develop a spinner of real potency.
Ultimately, Huntly's empathetic identification with Clithero leads him to a state of "phrenzy"; he thus inexplicably begins to experience a ravenous hunger (a sensation which he previously attributed to Clithero): "The inroads of hunger were already experienced, and this knowledge of the desperateness of my calamity, urged me to phrenzy" (163-64).
Yet only when integrated into the whole does it gather its real significance: a portrayal of man's desperateness to escape such a fate; the act a breaking of the order of the universe and a union of separate races; an underlying of the work's evocation of pity which requires relation to contex t: the realisation that such an incident is written as a reflection of real man's own fear of death, and as a spiritual message.
In your desperateness, you miss a point: Not every kiss between men--or even every sex act between men--announces gayness.
Who else would have remarked on the "Vergil ian sadness" and "Lucretian desperateness" of Ulysses and Remembrance of Things Past?
Although in certain cases the use of soxeax may serve the pragmatic function of downplaying the seriousness or desperateness of the subject's interest in the conversation, this does not suggest that soxeax IN GENERAL conveys the idea of lack of seriousness.
Desperateness at the prospects of limitations of, or no, choices and miscalculation based on stubbornness can lead to adventurous decisions.
Such deprivation serves to shape what John Fletcher terms Beckett's artful achievement of "distill[ing] in words" an "experience, or a vision, of the misery and of the desperateness of life."(59) Precisely in accord with the demanding aesthetic theory that Beckett everywhere expounds, then, the forms of art must correspond to this vision and not to illusionary notions of life.
4 (1994): 383-410; Sarah Franklin, "Postmodern Procreation: A Cultural Account of Assisted Reproduction," in Conceiving the New World Order, 323-45, and "Deconstructing 'Desperateness': The Social Construction of Infertility in Popular Representations of New Reproductive Technologies," in The New Reproductive Technologies, 200-229.
Cartoon #7 communicates the sense of desperateness of those collecting relief at the time, laying the accent on the relegation of relief's cruel paucity, It is reflective of the popular CPC slogan 'Tight or Starve" that often punctuated the pages of the Worker as the analogic "big hand" of government is finely outfitted in a suit and cufflinks as opposed to the thin.