depression

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fall into depression

1. To enter into a cognitive state characterized by an inability to experience pleasure as well as feelings of hopelessness, helplessness, and despondency; to become clinically depressed. Despite how many things were going well for me, I could feel myself falling into depression again. She closed herself off from her friends and family, and the isolation caused her to fall further into depression.
2. To enter into a period of drastic economic decline, widespread poverty, and high unemployment. Eventually the entire subprime mortgage market collapsed, causing economies around the world to fall into depression. The small country fell into depression shortly after gaining its independence.
See also: depression, fall

in the depths of (something)

In the middle of and wholly consumed by a particularly negative and/or difficult situation or emotional state. The country was in the depths of the worst economic disaster of the last century. While I was in the depths of depression, I found that I couldn't even get out of bed in the morning.
See also: depth, of

sink into depression

1. To enter into a cognitive state characterized by an inability to experience pleasure as well as feelings of hopelessness, helplessness, and despondency; to become clinically depressed. Despite how many things were going well for me, I could feel myself sinking into depression again. She closed herself off from her friends and family, and the isolation caused her to sink further into her depression.
2. To enter into a period of drastic economic decline, widespread poverty, and high unemployment. Eventually the entire subprime mortgage market collapsed, causing economies around the world to sink into depression. The small country sank into depression shortly after gaining its independence.
See also: depression, sink
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Background: Several studies indicated that medical community might exhibit a relatively high level of certain mental health problems, particularly depression. Knowledge about the predictors of such problems among physicians constitutes a basis for adequate prevention and management.
Aims & Objectives: Determination of prevalence of depression among physicians working in hospital ER in Makkah Al-Mokarramah city and evaluation of factors associated with depression among them.
The term depression is often used to describe the temporary sadness, loneliness or "blues" that almost everyone feels from time to time.
Although depression has long been a diagnosis made for adults, it has become increasingly prevalent in the youth of today.
SUMMARY: JHP is a 36-year-old married woman, a recreational therapist and lifelong regular aerobic exerciser (running, tennis, swimming, weight training) with a history of fibromyalgia symptoms dating from eight years ago, apparently triggered by a minor injury: While rollerblading she hit a parked car and "sprained my right knee." There followed a series of visits to doctors in different specialties, varied vague diagnoses and conservative treatments that failed to stem symptoms--migrating to the neck, to the other knee and to both upper extremities--all with an accompanying and deepening mood depression.
A rheumatologist finally made the diagnosis of fibromyalgia, at the same time strongly recommending that her depression was the first thing to treat.
Indeed, some leftist commentators seized on the market's collapse as evidence that capitalism was experiencing a "systemic crisis" akin to the Great Depression of 1929.
Psychiatrists have long distinguished between endogenous depressions, thought to reflect mainly biological influences, and reactive, or nonendogenous, depressions, pegged as the aftermath of particularly distressing life experiences.
Mania and clinical depressions, especially the forms that tend to recur, dearly reflect some malfunction in the brain.
Over the last decade, researchers have found that daily doses of bright light markedly improve the mood of people with recurring depressions that emerge only in winter (SN: 5/21/88, p.331).
Talking with a trained therapist can also be effective in treating certain depressions, particularly those that are less severe.
For eight years, psychiatrists have studied small groups of people suffering from depressions that recur in either winter or summer.
Through research in animals and humans, we will learn even more about mental disorders such as depression, manic-depressive illness, schizophrenia, panic disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder.
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