deport (someone)

(redirected from deport someone)

deport (someone)

To force someone to leave the country that they are in. Often said of people who are in a country that they were not born in. You'll be deported if you don't get your visa paperwork in order.
See also: deport

deport someone (from some place) (to some other place)

to expel or exile someone from one place to another, usually back to their prior country of residence. The government deported Jane from this country to her homeland. They deported Tom to Brazil from this country.
References in periodicals archive ?
Critics have since questioned whether it is acceptable for Malaysia to forcibly deport someone under UN protection.
This is the first time the government has used it to try to deport someone lawfully in the country.
Another complication is that ICE needs travel paperwork from a home country to deport someone, so immigrants often end up detained at least temporarily waiting for a flight.
This case is the first in which the government has relied on a 2017 amendment to the Law of Entry to deport someone who is already lawfully present in the country.
Almost miraculously, the Thai authorities shifted their stance, saying they would not deport someone who faced the death penalty.
But in most cases, you wouldn't want to deport someone before making sure they had their kids back.
Yet, it is very quick to deport someone like Sister Pat who is standing against exploitation and oppression in the country.
In a statement he says: "At a time when we are crying out for more qualified doctors - especially GPs - in the NHS, for the Home Office to seek to deport someone who is just about to qualify is nonsensical.
In any case, the decision to deport someone from a country should not be in the hands of an agent or an employer.
THERESA May lost one of her nine political lives after she is mocked for wrongly claiming Home Office could not deport someone because of his pet cat.
In fact, she used precisely the words that so often spring to mind when her more senior colleagues make pronouncements involving "human rights", for example when they conclude that it is not possible to deport someone who has, say, knifed a headmaster to death or snuffed out a 12-year-old girl's life in a hit-and-run incident.
It appears thatwe are afraid to deport terrorists or criminals from the EU because of their human rights but is ok to deport someone who has fled from the violence of a former Commonwealth country.
Romualdo Exmundo, who is also a doctor, said the long time it usually takes to deport someone would only worsen a very sick patient's condition.
A Home Office spokeswoman said Jacqui Smith could exclude or deport someone from Britain only if their presence was "not condusive to the public good".
It seems that when a decision to deport someone is made, common sense does not enter into the decision.