depict (one) as (something)

(redirected from depicted as)

depict (one) as (something)

To portray someone or something in a particular way. I'm worried that this biopic will depict me as a total diva. Don't depict me as a controlling mother when that's simply not true!
See also: depict

depict someone as something

to show someone as something; to make someone appear to be something. He did report the fire, but it is going too far to depict him as a hero. The artist depicted himself as a much younger man than he really was.
See also: depict
References in periodicals archive ?
As played by Gabriel Olds, Kenny is depicted as a guy who occasionally struggles with a conscience that Walker's book makes pretty clear never existed after his adolescence.
Placement" is depicted as "the logical conclusion of the rehabilitation process" because "the end goal of the vocational rehabilitation process is the achievement of an occupational objective" (Roessler & Rubin, 1998, p.
Client-centered placement has some similarities with counselor-centered placement, such as the continued support of the individual and expertise in the employment process proffered by the counselor Yet, client-centered placement is depicted as a distinct philosophy that is based on a psycho-educational model of helping individuals discover their inner resources and their own abilities to obtain jobs (Salomone 1996).
Hence, if the rehabilitation counseling relationship is to be depicted as an equal, balanced interaction between the counselor and individual, then it is advisable to examine why the biased term "job placement" is still being used in the rehabilitation profession.
In western Europe, the figurines often exhibit a hair net, depicted as crisscrosses, and, in some cases, show a belted string skirt.
Depicted as a closed triangle, this model espoused that individuals may never satisfy all of their needs, especially needs at the highest level.
Both are depicted as lonely, isolated men: Clinton playing solitaire late at night, while talking on the phone; Dole weeping on hearing the song ``You'll Never Walk Alone'' and keeping his decision to resign from the Senate a secret from his wife for many weeks.
Both are depicted as pragmatists, who have a hard time articulating a vision: when asked by Vice President Gore what direction he wanted to take, Clinton is said to have answered that ``he wanted his presidency back''; when asked by a reporter why he wanted to be president, Dole responds with a rambling, incoherent answer, ``modifying, amplifying and in the process often nullifying the impact of his own words.
Both Dole and Clinton are depicted as men who have a hard time making decisions: Woodward reports that Clinton's advisers realized that ``a clear direction or course was rarely set,'' and he reports that a Dole aide knew that ``there was never a bright line drawn'' with her boss, he ``would be constantly evolving.