depict (one) as (something)

(redirected from depicted as)

depict (one) as (something)

To portray someone or something in a particular way. I'm worried that this biopic will depict me as a total diva. Don't depict me as a controlling mother when that's simply not true!
See also: depict

depict someone as something

to show someone as something; to make someone appear to be something. He did report the fire, but it is going too far to depict him as a hero. The artist depicted himself as a much younger man than he really was.
See also: depict
References in periodicals archive ?
"Placement" is depicted as "the logical conclusion of the rehabilitation process" because "the end goal of the vocational rehabilitation process is the achievement of an occupational objective" (Roessler & Rubin, 1998, p.
Client-centered placement has some similarities with counselor-centered placement, such as the continued support of the individual and expertise in the employment process proffered by the counselor Yet, client-centered placement is depicted as a distinct philosophy that is based on a psycho-educational model of helping individuals discover their inner resources and their own abilities to obtain jobs (Salomone 1996).
Hence, if the rehabilitation counseling relationship is to be depicted as an equal, balanced interaction between the counselor and individual, then it is advisable to examine why the biased term "job placement" is still being used in the rehabilitation profession.
In western Europe, the figurines often exhibit a hair net, depicted as crisscrosses, and, in some cases, show a belted string skirt.
Depicted as a closed triangle, this model espoused that individuals may never satisfy all of their needs, especially needs at the highest level.
1).(12) Here we are faced with our first puzzle: the Four Temperaments, copied from a set of Flemish engravings by Maarten de Vos.(13) Each depicts a man and woman, surrounded by the emblematic paraphernalia of their controlling humor: the dour Phlegmatics, for instance, are depicted as fishers, to express the cold and moist character of their temperament (fig.
According to Prodicus, the young hero once encountered two women at a fork in the road: one of them, Pleasure (or Vice), accosted him, tempting him to follow her on a leisurely meander through all imaginable sensory delights; Virtue, on the other hand, encouraged him to take the strenuous path of action and public service, for which the rewards, though slow in coming, are substantial and lasting.(36) It was a sign of Hercules' heroism that he correctly made the difficult choice to follow Virtue - on a path that was generally depicted as a steep hill.