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beard (one) in (one's) den

To confront risk or danger head on, especially for the sake of possible personal gain. The phrase is a variation of the Biblical proverb "beard the lion in his den." OK, who is going to beard the boss in his den and tell him that the deal isn't happening?
See also: beard, den

beard the lion

To confront risk or danger head on, especially for the sake of possible personal gain. Refers to a proverb based on a Bible story from I Samuel, in which a shepherd, David, hunts down a lion that stole a lamb, grasps it by the beard, and kills it. Risks very often don't turn out well, but if you don't face them and beard the lion, you will never achieve the success you truly desire.
See also: beard, lion

beard the lion in his den

To confront risk or danger head on, especially for the sake of possible personal gain. Refers to a proverb based on a Bible story from I Samuel, in which a shepherd, David, hunts down a lion that stole a lamb, grasps it by the beard, and kills it. A risk very often doesn't turn out well, but if you don't face it and beard the lion in his den, you will never achieve the success you truly desire.
See also: beard, den, lion

den of iniquity

A place where seedy activities happen. I'm not surprised to hear that the police raided that club again—it's a den of iniquity!
See also: den, iniquity, of

the lion's den

A particularly dangerous, hostile, or oppressive place or situation, especially due to an angry or sinister person or group of people within it. I felt like I was walking into the lion's den when I went in front of the board for my annual review.
See also: den

walk into the lion's den

To enter into a particularly dangerous, hostile, or oppressive place or situation, especially due to an angry or sinister person or group of people within it. I felt like I was walking into the lion's den when I went in front of the board for my annual review.
See also: den, walk

beard the lion in his den

 and beard someone in his den
Prov. to confront someone on his or her own territory. I spent a week trying to reach Mr. Toynbee by phone, but his secretary always told me he was too busy to talk to me. Today I walked straight into his office and bearded the lion in his den. If the landlord doesn't contact us soon, we'll have to beard him in his den.
See also: beard, den, lion

den of iniquity

a place filled with criminal activity or wickedness. The town was a den of iniquity and vice was everywhere. Police raided the gambling house, calling it a den of iniquity.
See also: den, iniquity, of

beard the lion

Confront a danger, take a risk, as in I went straight to my boss, bearding the lion. This term was originally a Latin proverb based on a Bible story (I Samuel 17:35) about the shepherd David, who pursued a lion that had stolen a lamb, caught it by its beard, and killed it. By Shakespeare's time it was being used figuratively, as it is today. Sometimes the term is amplified to beard the lion in his den, which may combine the allusion with another Bible story, that of Daniel being shut in a lions' den for the night (Daniel 6:16-24).
See also: beard, lion

a den of iniquity

If a place is a den of iniquity, a lot of immoral things happen there. As time went on, he realised he was working in a den of iniquity and that the corruption spread right to the top of the organization.
See also: den, iniquity, of

walk into the lion's den

COMMON If you walk into the lion's den, you deliberately place yourself in a dangerous or difficult situation. Confident that he had done no wrong, the Minister last night walked into the lion's den of his press accusers, looked them in the eye, and fought back. Note: Other verbs such as go, step, or venture can be used instead of walk. We need to win tonight's game, but we are going into the lion's den without one of our key men. Note: You can also say that someone is thrown or sent into the lion's den if they are put in a difficult or dangerous situation. She was eagerly accepted by the teaching agency, and thrown straight into the lion's den at a tough comprehensive school in Surrey. Note: This expression comes from the story in the Bible of Daniel, who was thrown into a den of lions because he refused to stop praying to God. However, he was protected by God and the lions did not hurt him. (Daniel 6)
See also: den, walk

beard the lion in his den (or lair)

confront or challenge someone on their own ground.
This phrase developed partly from the idea of being daring enough to take a lion by the beard and partly from the use of beard as a verb to mean ‘face’, i.e. to face a lion in his den.
See also: beard, den, lion

the lion's den

a demanding, intimidating, or unpleasant place or situation.
See also: den

a den of iˈniquity/ˈvice

(disapproving) a place where people do bad things: She thinks that just because we sit around smoking and drinking beer the club must be a real den of iniquity.
See also: den, iniquity, of

the ˌlion’s ˈden

a difficult situation in which you have to face a person or people who are unfriendly or aggressive towards you: Before each one of her press conferences, she felt as if she were going into the lion’s den.This idiom comes from the story of Daniel in the Bible, who went into a lion’s den (= home) as a punishment but was not hurt by the lion.
See also: den

den of thieves, a

A group of individuals or a place strongly suspected of underhanded dealings. This term appears in the Bible (Matthew 21:13) when Jesus, driving the moneychangers from the Temple, said, “My house shall be called the house of prayer; but ye have made it a den of thieves.” Daniel Defoe used the term in Robinson Crusoe, published in 1719, and by the late eighteenth century it was well known enough to be listed with other collective terms such as “House of Commons” in William Cobbett’s English Grammar in a discussion of syntax relating to pronouns.
See also: den, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Antonio Rivera, the director of Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA) XI, identified the drug den owner as Rahadil Amari and his maintainers as Junjun Pongo Bisaro and Vincent Garcia Albastro.
'It is brought to your kind notice that narcotics dens are being run in your area of responsibility which is not only bringing bad name for police department but also resulting into increase of street crime since strong nexus between narcotic dealers and criminal elements has been found between street crime and narcotics,' reads Additional IG Karachi's letter written to all three zonal DIGs.
In Barangay Madaum, three drug pushers, a drug den maintainer, and 22 suspected drug users were arrested, while 46 alleged drug users were arrested Barangay San Isidro.
The children collected sponsorship money and brought in donations on 'Den Day' to raise money to support Save the Children's work.
Fill the gaps between the branches with fallen leaves to make your den cosy and wind-proof.
To make your new home from home special you could: Sweep the inside of your den and |find small logs for seats.
(BP) instituted surveys of fox dens in the Prudhoe Bay oilfield and adjacent undeveloped tundra.
Habitat availability within the home range (100% Minimum Convex Polygon) and proportional utilization (dens) by each animal were first converted to log-transformed ratios.
Porcupine dens were located in the soil of raised embankments of abandoned irrigation channels.
Finally, to assess the impact of litter presence on visitation rates of conspecifics, we conducted paired t-tests to determine if the number of male and female visits/night and the number of unique male and female visitors/night differed when the family occupied the tree versus after they moved from the den. Determining if the number of visits and unique visitors increased after the natal den was vacated enabled us to better understand the tolerance level mothers had for conspecific utilization of natal dens.
We used national monitoring data from 27 known arctic fox dens in Borgefjell (see Andersen et al.
Dens chosen by raccoons differed seasonally ([chi square] = 108.8, df = 12, P < 0.01).
These bears don't hunker down in dens to survive winter.
After learning during his emotional reunion with daughter Sharon that Dennis is his son,Den meets him again in the market and they head for the Den to discuss the past.
In the 1970s, FWP biologist Vince Yannone developed a "soft release" technique that uses hibernation dens as halfway houses to ease cubs back into the wild.