demand

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bow to (one's) demands

To submit to or accept another person's demands. You need to grow a spine. You can't just bow to your boss's demands every time!
See also: bow, demand

by popular demand

Due to a lot of requests or interest (in something). Here are your menus—you'll see that some of our special dishes from last summer are back by popular demand.
See also: by, demand, popular

demand (something) from (one)

To insist that someone do, provide, or relinquish something. I demand full attention from my students, so if you plan to nap or socialize in here, then you might as well drop this class right now.
See also: demand

demand (something) of (someone or something)

To insist that someone or something do, provide, or relinquish something. I demand the full attention of my students, so if you plan to nap or socialize in here, then you might as well drop this class right now. You're really demanding a lot of our washer by throwing such a big load in there.
See also: demand, of

in demand

Greatly sought after; desired or required by many people. Sometimes hyphenated. Sometimes used with the modifier "high" before or in the middle of the phrase. To the surprise of some, the product has been in high demand since it was first released. Retailers have struggled to maintain stock of the in-demand toy. Now that the property market has begun to boom, construction workers are in demand.
See also: demand

in great demand

Greatly sought after; desired or required by many people. To the surprise of some, the product has been in great demand since it was first released. Oh, that toy is in great demand—retailers have struggled to keep it in stock. Now that the property market has begun to boom, construction workers are in great demand.
See also: demand, great

make demands of (one)

To put a great deal of pressure on one to perform at an extremely high level. This is a cutthroat business, and it makes demands of anyone who wants to excel in it. The coach makes demands of all the kids who play on his team, but they also have more championship titles than any other team in the state.
See also: demand, make, of

make demands on (someone or something)

To put pressure on someone or something; to expect something from someone or something. The sprawling nature of their business makes a lot of demands on their accountants. Having to help my mother raise my baby sister has really made demands on my own ambitions. I can tell the new software is really making demands on my clunky old computer.
See also: demand, make, on

on demand

When needed or desired. Often hyphenated. It can be difficult to adjust to a baby's need to feed on demand. Cable television is being replaced in many homes by on-demand video services.
See also: demand, on

supply and demand

The amount of something available to purchase compared to the number of people who need or want to purchase it. The company has had a hard time figuring out supply and demand on their first product, which has been incredibly popular but very difficult to find in stores.
See also: and, demand, supply
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

bow to someone's demands

Fig. to yield to someone's demands; to agree to do something that someone has requested. In the end, they had to bow to our demands. We refused to bow to their demands that we abandon the project.
See also: bow, demand

demand something from someone or something

 and demand something of someone or something
to command that something be received from someone or a group or something; to demand that someone or a group or something do something. The muggers demanded money from everyone. The petitioners demanded a response from the board of directors. She demanded too much of her automobile.
See also: demand

in great demand

wanted by many people. Liz is in great demand as a singer. Mary's paintings are in great demand.
See also: demand, great

make demands of someone or something

 and make demands on someone or something
to expect someone or something to do something or act in a particular way. Please don't make demands of everyone in the shop. The boss is making a lot of demands on the new machinery.
See also: demand, make, of

rush on something

 and run on something
a large demand for something. There was a rush on bottled water during the drought. During the hot summer, there was a run on air conditioners.
See also: on, rush

supply and demand

the availability of things or people as compared to the need to utilize the things or people; the availability of goods compared to the number of willing customers for the goods. Sometimes you can find what you want by shopping around and other times almost no store carries the items you are looking for. It depends entirely on supply and demand. (Alludes to a principle of market economics.) Sometimes customers ask for things we do not carry in stock and other times we have things in abundance that no one wants to buy. Whether or not we can make money off of a product depends entirely on supply and demand.
See also: and, demand, supply
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in demand

Sought after, as in The general was in demand as an after-dinner speaker. [Early 1800s]
See also: demand

make demands on

Urgently require something of someone, as in Her mother's illness has made considerable demands on her time. [Late 1300s]
See also: demand, make, on

on demand

When needed or asked for, as in She's always ready to sing on demand, or Nowadays infants are generally fed on demand. This usage is a broadening of this phrase's meaning in finance, that is, "payable on being requested or presented," as in This note is payable on demand. [Late 1600s]
See also: demand, on
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

in deˈmand

wanted by many people; popular: Well-qualified young people with experience in marketing are very much in demand at the moment.
See also: demand

on deˈmand

done or happening whenever somebody asks: Feed the baby on demand.
See also: demand, on

by popular deˈmand

because a lot of people have asked for something: By popular demand, the play will run for another week.
See also: by, demand, popular
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

on demand

1. When presented for payment: a note payable on demand.
2. When needed or asked for: fed the baby on demand.
See also: demand, on
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Somewhat sporadically, the Philippine Supreme Court has recognized several socioeconomic rights as legally demandable rights that could be subject of judicial review.
On average, the New York City national banks held about 1/3 of their loans as demandable loans (example: August 22, 1907 New York City national banks held $251 million in call loans out of a total of $711 million--these numbers are in Sprague 1910, Watkins 1929 and Laughlin 1912).
Therefore, it is no wonder that the person who only lets die has lower efforts demandable of her post-omission.
"'The Role of Demandable Debt in Structuring Optimal Banking Arrangements," American Economic Review 81 (June 1991): 497-513.
"Selling a Company: Assessing the Minimum Demandable Price," Global Review of Accounting and Finance 6, no.
Importantly, this rapid growth comes along with increased risk-taking.[17] In addition, the interconnectedness of the fund sector with the wider financial system, more widespread use of synthetic leverage and the increasing prevalence of demandable equity imply that potential for a systemic impact is increasing, should the investment fund industry come under stress.
If financial institutions choose to fund themselves with short-term, demandable debt, they can include provisions that make them more resilient, therefore reducing the incentive for runs.
While most retail deposits are demandable upon request, they usually constitute a more stable form of funding for banks compared with funding in wholesale markets.
(1) For example, Nobel laureate economist Robert Lucas (2011: 20), in the slides accompanying a recent lecture that is otherwise favorable to free markets, states flatly that "a fractional reserve banking system will always be fragile, a house of cards." In such a view the best that can be done is to institute government guarantees to mitigate fragility, or perhaps to outlaw fractional reserve banking, as recommended by Kotlikoff (2010) among others, by banning the modern practice of providing payments services through checking accounts whose balances are demandable debts.
1991: The role of demandable debt in structuring optimal banking arrangements.
Kahn, "The Role of Demandable Debt in Structuring Optimal Banking Arrangements," American Economic Review 81, June 1991, pp.
Hulsmann begins by describing two "inherently different" ideal-type banking products: "money tides and fractional-reserve IOUs." Although he allows that "most financial instruments have, of course, an intermediate-type nature," he does not allow that demandable debt--the common contractual form historically taken by demand deposits and banknotes--is a blend of the two types.
In particular, in a crisis, banks may need enough liquidity assistance to meet all of their demandable obligations, as stressed by Chang and Velasco (2000c).