delusion


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labor under the delusion of/that

To live, operate, or function with the unyielding belief in something, especially that which is fanciful, unrealistic, or untrue. Primarily heard in US. Jeremy's always labored under the delusion of being a great writer, even though he's never written more than a few crummy poems. No one likes paying taxes, but those who would call for them to be done away with altogether are laboring under the delusion that our society can function without them!
See also: delusion, labor, of, that

delusions of grandeur

Unrealistic beliefs about the amount of power and influence one has. You're just an intern, so you definitely have delusions of grandeur if you think the boss is going to listen to you!
See also: delusion, of

delusions of grandeur

a false impression of your own importance.
This expression is the equivalent of the French phrase folie de grandeur , which came into English in the late 19th century and is still used today.
See also: delusion, of

delusions of ˈgrandeur

(often humorous) a belief that you are more important than you really are: He’s been suffering from delusions of grandeur ever since he became manager.
See also: delusion, of
References in periodicals archive ?
As these delusions ballooned, so did their manifestations through words and actions.
This type of delusion has been considered characteristic of schizophrenia, but not exclusive or specific of it.
had the fifth highest average delusion rate at 22.67 percent.
In this study, about half (51.2%) of all patients had a delusion, and the delusion of other persons are stealing (35.3%) was the most common, followed by delusion of self is in danger (21.3%).
Functional neuroimaging studies of drug-induced and endogenous early psychosis reveal PEs in frontal cortex in response to unsurprising events--PE intensity correlates with delusion severity (Corlett et al.
Delusions are the hallmark of psychotic disorders (1).
Folie a deux, or induced delusional disorder, refers to the transference of delusions from the primary person (inducer) to a secondary person (recipient).
Thus, the author begins by outlining an interesting history of delusion, pointing out the overwhelming role played by the primary delusion of Jaspers and by the sensitive delusion of Kretschmer in the evolution of delusional ideation as a concept.
Davis of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn, noting that anxiety, depression, and medications such as opioids or treatments for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder can contribute to the delusions.
Key words: prodrome, primary delusion, culture, sociopolitical environment, behavior
Let's face it, advertising is not exactly immune to delusions. Damn it, we seem to collect them.
REVOLUTIONS OF THE HEART GENDER, POWER AND THE DELUSIONS OF LOVE
Cotard's Syndrome (CS) is a rare clinical event, characterized by negation delusion (or nihilist), generally regarding the body (frequently the patient believes that he or she does not have one or more organs) or regarding the existence (the individual judges that himself or everybody in the world is dead or reduced to nothing, being able to judge himself a zombie), but also concerning concepts/conditions [1] (such as a CS case described in which a woman was sure about not being pregnant, despite of obvious evidences [2]).
For example, in In re Hargrove's Will, (28) a fairly typical case from New York, a decedent allegedly suffered from an "insane delusion" that his two children were born of a different father.
In this case report, our aim is to discuss how disorders with psychotic symptoms may affect different cultural life styles, circumstances, experience, delusion contents of identification and acceptance in a patient formerly diagnosed with DSD with male- pseudohermaphroditism and followed up with the diagnosis of bipolar affective disorder (BAD).