defeat

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admit defeat

To yield to the opposition or accept that one is wrong in some pursuit. Well, I ran a good campaign, but it is time I admitted defeat in this election.
See also: admit, defeat

go down in defeat

To lose to an opponent. The team refused to go down in defeat and tied the score in the third period.
See also: defeat, down, go

go down to defeat

To lose to an opponent. The team refused to go down to defeat and tied the score in the third period.
See also: defeat, down, go

snatch defeat from the jaws of victory

To fail, lose, or be defeated despite the appearance that one would be victorious, especially due to a mistake, error, or poor judgment. (An ironic reversal of the more common "snatch victory from the jaws of defeat.") We were ahead by nearly 20 points with less than half the quarter remaining—how on earth did we manage to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory like that? The candidate has led in the polls right up to election day, but with that unfortunate remark last night, he may well have snatched defeat from the jaws of victory.
See also: defeat, jaw, of, snatch, victory

snatch victory from the jaws of defeat

To win, succeed, or be victorious at the last moment, despite the apparent likelihood of failure or defeat. They were down by nearly 20 points with less than half of the last quarter remaining, but through sheer skill and perseverance they managed to snatch victory from the jaws of defeat. The candidate has been behind in the polls right up to election day, but with that unfortunate remark by his opponent last night, he may end up snatching victory from the jaws of defeat.
See also: defeat, jaw, of, snatch, victory

the jaws of (something)

Something, especially something unpleasant or undesirable, that very nearly comes to pass. Used especially after "snatch from." The drowning fishermen were snatched from the jaws of death by a passing cruise ship. They were down by nearly 20 points with less than half of the last quarter remaining, but through sheer skill and perseverance they managed to snatch victory from the jaws of defeat.
See also: jaw, of

go down in defeat

 and go down to defeat
Fig. to submit to defeat; to be defeated. The team went down in defeat again. She fears going down in defeat.
See also: defeat, down, go

snatch victory from the jaws of defeat

Cliché to win at the last moment. At the last moment, the team snatched victory from the jaws of defeat with a last-second full-court basket.
See also: defeat, jaw, of, snatch, victory

the jaws of ˈdeath, deˈfeat, etc.

(literary) used to describe an unpleasant situation that almost happens: The team snatched victory from the jaws of defeat.
See also: jaw, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Skeeter Defeater will retain its name and will continue to be sold at well-known brick and mortar and online retail outlets, like Ace Hardware, Amazon.com, walmart.com and homedepot.com.
Joseph Kim's understanding of PRD (or the problem of religious diversity) could be shortly rephrased as follows: (1) there are many religious believers and non-believers, thus, many "mutually exclusive religious propositions"; (2) they are epistemic peers (similar people in terms of intelligence, honesty, data etc.); (3) all these propositions should be given "equal weight"; (4) given 3, these propositions are defeaters for one another; (5) consequently, there's no tenability for any of these propositions; (6) in conclusion, any religious exclusivism is groundless, it is unwarranted.
More specifically, SPINdle supports all the defeasible logic features (facts, strict rules, defeasible rules, defeaters and superiority relationships), modal defeasible logics [14] with modal operator conversions, negation and conflicting (mutually exclusive) literals.
C3: The evolutionary naturalist has an undefeatable defeater for R.
An indirect defense to such a challenge could involve challenging the acceptability of the defeater (Pollack, 1987; Rescher, 1977, p.
Thus, evolutionary naturalism serves as an undercutting defeater that removes our grounds for trusting in the reliability of our noetic equipment.
Broadly, speaking, the experimental record of social psychology supports the thesis that reasons are not generally responsive to counter-reasons or arguments, and the thesis that the degree of cognitive commitment to a reason varies with the perceived degree of social support for that reason, and with 'interpersonal' factors in the reasoner's predicament, such as his or her degree of liking for the communicator or the person who asserts the argument that is (to an observer) a defeater or supporter for the reason in question.
<[A.sub.2], [negation]recommendable(f6)) is a proper defeater for <[A.sub.1], recommendable(f6)).
Saying that perception, for example, provides prima facie grounds for belief, grounds which are quite adequate in themselves but which may be overridden by some subsequent defeater, doesn't tell us when we are justified in supposing that there are no (undefeated) defeaters.
(21) If he is right, then we have a rebutting defeater for Wolterstorff's account.
Griffiths then endeavored to show that B1 is false, with the modest goal of removing a potential defeater of C1-C3.
Music August Burns Red with special guests Bless The Fall, Defeater and Beartooth, 6 p.m.