deepfake


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deepfake

1. A fake video of someone created using artificial intelligence methods ("deep learning"), typically with the goal of mimicking that person's physical attributes and mannerisms to the extent that it appears real. We're in trouble if a lot of people think these deepfakes are actually genuine.
2. The system or method used to create such a video. When bad actors start using deepfake to spread disinformation, it's going to be hard to stop.
References in periodicals archive ?
Deepfakes use a machine-learning technique known as deep learning to automatically superimpose a new face on an existing video.
According to Axios, criminals are using deepfakes to impersonate business chiefs.
The good thing is that people are now aware that these deepfakes do exist and we can be more vigilant before they can be used to spread panic or ruin reputations.
Zuckerberg said Facebook is trying to determine whether deepfakes are "a completely different category" of misinformation and added, "there's a very good case that they are."
Deepfake headlines first began circulating in 2017.
The deepfake video, showing Zuckerberg above a CBSN news banner, was created by artists Bill Posters and Daniel Howe and was posted on Instagram as part of an art installation called Spectre, PolitiFact said.
A DEEPFAKE computer program can take a single image of somebody and convert it into a video sequence indistinguishable from the real person.
The word "deepfake" is a combination of the words "deep learning" and "fake." Deep learning refers to the use of machine learning and artificial intelligence to create images of human faces.
While this instance of such deepfake technology was harmless, the practice has helped spread misinformation online, wherein public figures are cast in realistic-looking video footage.
Breland covered the Gabon story and has closely followed the emergence of a new technology to manipulate videos, called deepfake.
AI also underpins the technology commonly called 'deepfake,' in which algorithms create realistic video and audio forgeries.
For a discussion of the rise of such manipulation in videos via "deepfakes," see, e.g., Sarah Scoles, These New Tricks Can Outsmart Deepfake Videos--For Now, WIRED (Oct.
The technology to create "deepfake" videos that show people doing and saying things they never did or said is developing.
Just as the Industrial Age marked a seismic shift in the use of industrial technology on the battlefield, the Information Age has brought a new arms race defined by information and misinformation--from low-tech social media propaganda to artificial intelligence-enabled "deepfake" audio-visual content.