deepfake

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deepfake

1. A fake video of someone created using artificial intelligence methods ("deep learning"), typically with the goal of mimicking that person's physical attributes and mannerisms to the extent that it appears real. We're in trouble if a lot of people think these deepfakes are actually genuine.
2. The system or method used to create such a video. When bad actors start using deepfake to spread disinformation, it's going to be hard to stop.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, strategic use of AI increasingly powers cyber-warfare and real-life weapons, threatens to manipulate democracy through so-called "deep fakes" (perfectly emulating the appearance of known public figures), or to exacerbate inequality and discrimination by depriving classes of citizens, on a massive scale, of their most basic rights to privacy and free speech.
Media fabricated through AI (called "deep fakes") are a huge concern to both lawmakers and intelligence officials.
Finally, videos are clipped, edited, and to some extremes, AI-processed (to come up with deep fakes), to remove context and used to discredit political opponents.
However, the advanced StyleGAN also raises concerns that if it can create such convincing images of fake humans, what's stopping someone from creating more believable 'Deep Fakes'?
AI could leverage deep fakes to make social engineering attacks even more sophisticated.
The softening of the state will be achieved through deep fakes and forays of artificial intelligence a la 5th Generation Warfare.
Lyons is already tracking the next generation of CG images dubbed "deep fakes" that don't even require the expertise of a creator like Tsirbas.
No doubt in an age of "deep fakes," fake news, polarization, and paranoia, individuals will have to get better at critically consuming media.
And thanks to apps like FakeApp and Lyrebird, these so-called 'deep fakes' can now be produced by anyone with a computer or smartphone.
The term for these all too feasible digital manipulations of audio and video content is "deep fakes."
In some corners of the Internet, people are using open-source software to swap celebrities' faces into pornographic videos, a phenomenon called Deep Fakes. It's not hard to imagine a world in which social media is awash with doctored videos targeting ordinary people to exact revenge, extort or to simply troll.
If the post-truth age, where fake news is all the rage, puts you off let's see if you like deep fakes. It's just the latest in AI (artificial intelligence), relying on not-so-complicated-anymore technology to superimpose anybody's face and voice onto any video and make them appear to say and do basically anything you like.
Both images are the result of digital manipulation, and what, in its most ominous form, is called deep fakes: technology that makes it possible to show people saying things they never said, doing things they never did.