decided

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decide against (someone or something)

1. To choose not to accept someone. Yes, Holly was a strong candidate, but we ultimately decided against her for the job.
2. To choose not to do something. I was so tired that I decided against going out with my friends tonight.
See also: decide

decide on (someone or something)

To choose someone or something, usually after a period of deliberation. Yes, Holly was a strong candidate, but we ultimately decided on someone else for the job opening. After agonizing over the menu, I finally decided on mint chocolate chip ice cream.
See also: decide, on
References in periodicals archive ?
For hypotheses 1-6, the Big Five traits of Emotional Stability, Conscientiousness and Extraversion; and the narrow traits of Career Decidedness, Sense of Identity and Optimism will be negatively associated with change of academic major ([H1.
Patton and Creed (2003) conducted a study in which 376 secondary school students studying between grade 8 and 12 were investigated for levels of career maturity assessed by attitude and knowledge, work commitment, values related to work, career decidedness associated with indecision and certainty, career decision- making, self-efficacy and self-esteem.
The influence of a career course and a career course cognitive restructuring combination on self-efficacy, career decidedness and career indecision.
Investigations of college students have found that perception of calling is associated with positive personal and academic outcomes including higher levels of career decidedness (Duffy & Sedlacek, 2007) and self-clarity and resilience (French & Domene, 2010).
Engagement in adolescent career preparation: Social support, personality and the development of choice decidedness and congruence.
1999) reported support of construct validity through the negative correlation of the CTI with the Identity and Barrier subscales of My Vocational Situation (Holland, Daiger, & Power, 1980); the Certainty subscale of the Career Decision Scale (Osipow, Carney, Winer, Yanico, & Koschier, 1987); and the Decidedness, Comfort, Self-Clarity, Knowledge About Occupations and Training, Decisiveness, and Career Choice Importance subscales of the Career Decision Profile (Jones, 1989).
Play scenarios with anxiety and levels of Cultural and decidedness, as communication appropriate disparities 4.
Career education participation has also been associated with personal gains in career decidedness and career maturity, decreasing career indecision and self-efficacy (Herr, Cramer & Niles, 2004).
The importance of metacognition to career development is emphasized by the research of Symes and Stewart (1999), who found a significant relationship between metacognition and vocational decidedness; those who displayed higher levels of metacognitive activity also demonstrated higher levels of vocational decidedness in comparison to those with lower levels of metacognition.
In one point, however, she differs from her brother, namely in her strength of character and decidedness of action.
The relationship of vocational decidedness and satisfaction with dogmatism and self-esteem, Journal of Vocational Behavior, 5: 95-102.
Higher scores indicate higher levels of CDSE, which is positively related to a number of career outcomes, such as career maturity and career decidedness (Gushue & Whitson, 2006).
In the communication phase, individuals realize that they need to make a decision based on internal and external communication that they receive from themselves and their environment, whereas in the analysis phase individuals seek to fully assess the gap between their existing state of indecision and their desired state of decidedness.
2008; Scott & Ciani, 2008) and that career education improves career decision-making skills, career decidedness and vocational identity (Folsom & Reardon, 2003; Fouad, Cotter & Kantamneni, 2009).
Constructs represented by the three scales in this instrument have been positively associated with vocational identity, career decidedness, and academic and nonacademic indexes of self-concept, and negatively associated with more referrals to the principal's office and lower expectations for achieving life goals (Lapan et al.