debris field

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Related to debris: Space debris

debris field

An area in which debris, e.g., from a wreckage, demolition, explosion, etc., is scattered. Investigators are still inspecting the debris field from the downed passenger plane for clues to its sudden crash.
See also: field
References in periodicals archive ?
Secure Clevis Hooks and Canvas Work Gloves for Debris Handling;
People buy debris from a mine to sieve it for precious stones
So far the Texas Department of Transportation, which is working alongside local contractors, has removed more than 461,096 cubic yards of debris from areas affected by Harvey.
The bill would reauthorize NOAA's Marine Debris Program through fiscal year 2022.
And this is just the debris that scientists have been able to track.
In the new work, to find out how the flight's debris drifted since the crash, researchers ran a computer model that used oceanographic data from the EU Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service, including data of global surface currents and winds over the past two years.
The Lianshan Bridge debris flow gully is located in Yinxing Town, Wenchuan County, Sichuan Province of China.
Australia has led the search for the plane, which went missing in March 2014 with 239 people on board on a flight from the Malaysian capital, Kuala Lumpur, to Beijing, and Transport Minister Darren Chester said the debris, found last week, was an "item of interest".
With the increase of human space activities, space debris environment has deteriorated[1], pose a serious impact threat to the spacecraft, especially to manned spacecraft[2].
We (the insurance company) will pay your expense to remove debris of Covered Property and other debris that is on the described premises, (emphasis added) when such debris is caused by or results from flood.
Liow said that according to the report of the Malaysia investigation team in Maldives, most of the debris there are negative and not plane material.
The Rawalpindi Waste Management Company staff spotted the two people throwing the heavy debris of a razed building into the channel.
Two events in recent years dramatically increased the amount of fragmentation debris in orbit.
Invasion biologists say it's hard to determine whether marine life washing ashore on the debris will be a threat to the environment.
Scott Milner, of the San Luis Obispo County Department of Environmental Health, uses a radiation measuring device to check Avila Beach in California, for any dangerous debris that has drifted from Japan as a result of a tsunami.