deal in (something)

(redirected from dealing in)

deal in (something)

1. To work in a particular field. I deal in medical supplies these days, selling X-ray and MRI machines to hospitals. Mike has been acting so secretive lately that I'm starting to think he's dealing in something illegal.
2. To focus on or include something. Your term paper for this class must deal in the major themes of modernism.
See also: deal

deal in something

to buy and sell something. My uncle is a stockbroker. He deals in stocks and bonds. My aunt deals in antiques.
See also: deal

deal in

1. Also, deal with. Be occupied or concerned with, as in Jim deals in generalities, or This book deals with idioms. The first term dates from the late 1500s, the variant from about 1300.
2. Do business or trade in something, as in They deal in diamonds. [Late 1500s] Also see deal with.
3. deal someone in. Also, deal one a hand. Include someone, give someone a share, as in I hope they'll deal me in on this new enterprise. This usage comes from card games, where to deal has meant "to distribute cards" since the 16th century. [Early 1900s]
See also: deal

deal in

v.
1. To include someone in a card game by giving that player cards: Deal me in—I'm just getting up to get some potato chips. The dealer dealt in all the players who sat at the table.
2. To be in some particular line of work or pursuit: She deals in computer hardware. The gangster dealt in stolen goods.
See also: deal
References in periodicals archive ?
As there were some reports of riots while one shop at Burnes Centre was 'ransacked', most shopkeepers dealing in essential goods chose to close their businesses.
Regardless of which test they follow, most courts in most cases examine whether a liability insurer has fulfilled its duty of good faith and fair dealing in settlement by comparing (1) the amount of the policy limits, (2) the likelihood that the insured would be found liable, and (3) the amount or range of damages reasonably likely if the claim was not settled.
Regardless of the particular standard of settlement conduct a court may follow, in almost all jurisdictions the courts have agree that liability for extracontractual or bad-faith damages because of alleged bad faith and unfair dealing in settlement by a liability insurer depends on what the liability insurer knew and when it knew it.