dealing


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deal (one) in

To include one in something. Often used in the imperative "deal me in." The phrase originated in card games, in which cards are distributed among the players by "dealing" them. If you guys are playing poker in there, deal me in! Bobby really wants to be involved in this project, so deal him in too.
See also: deal

deal a death blow

1. To strike someone (typically with a weapon) and cause immediate death. The warrior swiftly dealt a death blow to his adversary on the battlefield.
2. By extension, to cause the abrupt end of something. His arrest and subsequent conviction dealt a death blow to his successful career as an attorney. Despite the company's recent success, the massive recall dealt it a death blow.
See also: blow, deal, death

deal in (something)

1. To work in a particular field. I deal in medical supplies these days, selling X-ray and MRI machines to hospitals. Mike has been acting so secretive lately that I'm starting to think he's dealing in something illegal.
2. To focus on or include something. Your term paper for this class must deal in the major themes of modernism.
See also: deal

deal out

1. To distribute. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "deal" and "out." Deal out the itinerary so we can see which landmark we're visiting first.
2. To exclude one from something. The phrase likely originated from card games, in which cards are distributed among the players by "dealing" them. In this usage, the excluded person is typically stated between "deal" and "out." If you guys are going to keep playing poker, then deal me out—I have to get something upstairs. Bobby isn't going to the conference anymore, so deal him out of this project.
See also: deal, out

wheel and deal

To proactively and frequently pursue business deals or other actions of benefit to oneself or one's organization through the building and leveraging of contacts and relationships, especially in a prolific, aggressive, or unscrupulous way. You can't just expect to move up in the workplace without making some contacts. You have to wheel and deal a little. Nothing gets done on Capitol Hill without a lot of people wheeling and dealing. It's just how politics is.
See also: and, deal, wheel

wheeling and dealing

The act of proactively and frequently pursuing business deals or other actions of benefit to oneself or one's organization through the building and leveraging of contacts and relationships, especially in a prolific, aggressive, or unscrupulous way. Nothing gets done on Capitol Hill without a lot of wheeling and dealing. It's just how politics is. You need to cool it with the wheeling and dealing and just let the process work as it is supposed to. You'll be judged on your qualifications, not who you know.
See also: and, dealing, Wheeling

deal something out

to pass something out piece by piece, giving everyone equal shares. The manager dealt the proposals out, giving each person an equal number to read. I'll deal out some more proposals.
See also: deal, out

*tough on someone

severe and demanding in dealing with someone. (*Typically: act ~; be ~; become ~; get~.) My boss is very tough on me, but I need the structure and discipline.
See also: on, tough

wheel and deal

to take part in clever (but sometimes dishonest or immoral) business deals. John loves to wheel and deal in the money markets. Jack got tired of all the wheeling and dealing of big business and retired to run a pub in the country.
See also: and, deal, wheel

deal out

1. Distribute, as in He dealt out more and more work. [Late 1300s] Also see deal in, def. 3.
2. deal someone out. Exclude someone, as in I don't have time for this project, so deal me out. This usage is the opposite of deal in, def. 3.
See also: deal, out

wheel and deal

Operate or manipulate for one's own interest, especially in an aggressive or unscrupulous way. For example, Bernie's wheeling and dealing has made him rich but not very popular. This term comes from gambling in the American West, where a wheeler-dealer was a heavy bettor on the roulette wheel and at cards. [Colloquial; c. 1940]
See also: and, deal, wheel

wheel and deal

If someone wheels and deals, they use a lot of different methods and contacts to achieve what they want in business or politics. He still wheels and deals around the globe. Note: This kind of activity can be called wheeling and dealing. He hates the wheeling and dealing associated with political life. Note: This expression is often used to show that you think someone is behaving dishonestly.
See also: and, deal, wheel

wheel and deal

engage in commercial or political scheming.
The verb wheel is here used to mean ‘control events’. The sense is related to the noun a big wheel , meaning ‘an important person who makes things happen’.
See also: and, deal, wheel

ˌwheel and ˈdeal

(disapproving) do a lot of complicated deals in business or politics, often in a dishonest way: He’s spent the last three years wheeling and dealing in the City.I don’t want to go into politics — there’s too much wheeling and dealing. ▶ ˌwheeler-ˈdealer noun
See also: and, deal, wheel

deal out

v.
1. To exclude someone from a card game by not giving that player cards: Deal me out—I have to go to the bathroom.
2. To distribute something to someone: The dealer dealt the cards out. The politician dealt out pamphlets explaining her position on the issues. Deal out another hand; I'm ready to play.
See also: deal, out

wheel and deal

in. to negotiate, cajole, and connive—aggressively. (see also wheeler-dealer.) If you can’t wheel and deal, you can’t run for elective office.
See also: and, deal, wheel

wheel and deal

Informal
To engage in the advancement of one's own interests, especially in a canny, aggressive, or unscrupulous way.
See also: and, deal, wheel
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By the early 1980s, a number of books had been published dealing with the following issues: the relationship between the environment on one hand and education, development, and mass media on the other, the social dimension of the environment, the relationship between the environment and Islam, and the environmental issues.
Elsewhere we have surveyed Arab literature dealing with the question of the environment (Selim, 2004).
But, fundamentally, that does not preclude buyers from exercising consumer rights litigation that calls for disclosure warnings and fair dealing by the issuer.
com/reports/c50334) has announced the addition of Insider Dealing and Money Laundering in the EU: Law and Regulation to their offering.
This work presents a comparative study of the provisions relating to insider dealing under the EC Insider Dealing Directive.
Understand the Needs of the Seller: Typically, when structuring a transaction with a lender, bank or institution, an investor can expect to be dealing with a mid-level employee with his (or her) own agenda.
As a typical school MIS director, dealing with a mix of 286 and newer PCs, New Deal School Suite 98 is the only graphical solution that I can run on all my computers, networked or standalone.