deal with (someone or something)

(redirected from deal with something)

deal with (someone or something)

1. To manage or handle someone or something (usually someone or something unpleasant). The phrase "deal with it" can be used dismissively to leave a task to someone else. I just can't deal with him when gets hysterical like this. I'll deal with the construction problems at the house—you go on ahead to work. A: "Sir, I'm not sure how you want me to handle all these calls." B: "Oh, just deal with it, Jeff."
2. To focus on or include something. Your term paper must deal with the major themes of modernism and link them to your chosen text.
3. To conduct business with someone or something. It's such a pain dealing with that company. They sent us the wrong size T-shirts and then took weeks to issue a refund.
4. To treat someone in a particular way. The owner dealt with me very nicely, so I'll definitely go back to his shop.
5. slang To kill someone. Don't worry, once I deal with the informant, he won't go running to the cops ever again.
See also: deal

deal with someone or something

to manage someone or something. This is not a big problem. I think I can deal with it. I am sure I can deal with Jill.
See also: deal

deal with someone

Sl. to kill someone. "Spike, you deal with that cop," said the crime boss. The agent planned how best to deal with the rebel leader without getting caught.
See also: deal

deal with

1. See deal in, def. 1.
2. Do business with someone, as in I like dealing with this company. [Late 1600s] Also see deal in, def. 2.
3. Take action in, handle, administer, dispose of, as in The committee will deal with this matter. [Second half of 1400s]
4. Act in a specified way toward someone, as in He dealt extremely fairly with his competitors. [c. 1300]
See also: deal

deal with

v.
1. To be about something; have to do with something: This report deals with teaching students how to read.
2. To confront or grapple with something: I can't deal with all of these problems at the same time. These researchers are dealing with the most difficult issues in the field. You dealt with their hostility very well.
See also: deal

deal with someone

in. to kill someone. (From the milder expression meaning to cope with or tend to someone.) The agent planned how best to deal with the rebel leader without getting caught.
See also: deal, someone
References in classic literature ?
"This time, my lord cardinal, we have to deal with something more easily found than a million."
"I don't think half a day goes by where I don't have to deal with something.
There is also evidence of young women missing days at school because they do not have the resources to properly deal with something that is a natural part of life.
"I believe we could surely deal with something in the order of half a million for several years," he added.
He can then refer you to a behaviourist who can assess your cat and put a behaviour modification programme in place to help your cat, who may be using the behaviour to deal with something he finds stressful.
It was really nice to deal with something positive for change.
"The fact that Rich can deal with something as elusive as creativity and something as matter-of-fact as a deadline, which our craft many times imposes on us, is, I think, indicative of the breadth of spiritual and philosophical elements of just one subject at the Expo."
"If you take a bang on your head and you don't feel quite right, you know in yourself you have to deal with something because it's serious." Parling will miss England's clashes with New Zealand, South Africa, Samoa and Australia at Twickenham.
I can't imagine how on earth you deal with something like that and, indeed, how you stay positive.
On occasion, though, great ingenuity is required to deal with something bleak, dull and ugly.
Shanmugan has said it was a blow to ASEAN credibility that "it was unable to deal with something that is happening in our neighborhood and not say something about it."
Mr Gove, receiving a lukewarm reception from delegates, added: "Ofsted is seen as an arm of the Spanish Inquisition or Sean Connery in The Untouchables ready to storm in without any notice in order to deal with something that has gone drastically wrong.
"Ofsted is seen as an arm of the Spanish Inquisition ready to storm in without any notice in order to deal with something that has gone drastically wrong.
"Andre (my son) is going to deal with something like that and we are going to give the funds to charity," the Daily Mail quoted her as saying.