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dead

1. Lacking any excitement, vitality, etc. This place is dead, man. Let's bounce. That restaurant is always dead during lunch hour. I have no idea how they stay open.
2. Exhausted to the point of no longer being able to function. I'm usually pretty dead by the time I get home after going to the gym after work, so I just eat dinner and go to bed. I could tell my players were giving it their best, but after 90 minutes, their legs were just dead.
3. No longer working at all due to a malfunction or breakdown. My computer is dead. I can't even turn it on.
4. Having been drained of all power, as of a battery. These batteries are dead. Do you have any new ones? My phone is dead, and it's going to take a while to charge it.
5. Absolutely. You'd better be dead certain about this decision, because you can't take it back.
6. Exact(ly). See that sign? The one dead ahead. You've got to hit the button in the dead center or else it won't work.
7. Abruptly or suddenly, and often without further movement. The deer stopped dead in its tracks when it heard me coming. He was able to stop the car dead on the edge of the cliff.
8. slang Defunct or having no power or possibility of coming into effect. That bill was dead even before it reached the senate—public opinion killed it.
9. No longer having any significance or bearing on anything. As far as I'm concerned, that's a dead issue, so let's stop discussing it.
10. Total or utter. There was dead silence in the room when she announced her resignation.
11. slang A term used to indicate that one thinks something is extremely funny (so much so that they've died laughing). Typically used as a hashtag on social media. OMG that's hilarious! #dead

dead

1. mod. quiet and uneventful; boring. The day was totally dead.
2. mod. very tired. I went home from the office, dead as usual.
3. mod. dull; lifeless; flat. This meal is sort of dead because I am out of onions.
4. mod. no longer effective; no longer of any consequence. That guy is dead—out of power.
5. mod. [of an issue] no longer germane; no longer of any importance. Forget it! It’s a dead issue.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The commodification of semen and its mobilisation via the increased use of AI challenge the very notion of death as a discrete event that divides the realms of live- and deadness.
The first involves a symbiotic perverse excitement, associated with Vector One symptoms; the second, a dismissive and frustrating deadness, associated with Vector Two symptoms.
Unlike the US ski resorts where the pistes are crowded in the morning, most of the times the skier or the boarder would encounter the morning deadness or doldrums on the jagged slopes of the ranges in Europe.
All New York Episcopalian churches give the same impression of good, gloomy Gotham taste combined with deadness.
word, a deadness to motives of earth, a firm hold of the truths of the
Did we once more become entrapped in a dull civic deadness, perhaps worse than before?
The communal italicized voice, which has used the first-person plural as opposed to the other voice's first-person singular, asserts that we won't be ruled by dread any longer, however informing and prophetic dread may be, and however much a deadness of spirit remains lodged within us.
Kickasola writes, "There is a certain deadness that permeates the entire Decalogue" (174).
Stanbury believes that the Lollard "assertion of deadness protests, of course, too much" that the group contested images because they believed in their vitality: "The very insistence on the deadness of images points to their potential vivacity--to their potential for animation" (26).
The spectacular deadness of emotion disturbs us both
For example, a congregant might not experience any aliveness or joy in Christian work or fellowship, but they could tend to "put on a face" to mask the deadness they feel inside.
Rule by coercion, terror and violence, as Saddam Hussain discovered during his heinous reign, will simply strengthen the totalitarian impulse in a human community, imbuing it, as Hannah Arendt demonstrated in her seminal work, On Totalitarianism, with a deadness of spirit, and impeding it from producing or bringing to excellence new genres of thought entirely its own.
Vitality was to be regained, they insisted, by recognition of the forces of deadness, of which indifference and pallid acquiescence were prominent.
Overall, Diamond's is a paper that connects the thought of Hughes, Coetzee, and Cavell, in probing the ways in which the world can resist our thinking--try to grasp the deadness of Hughes' six young men, once so alive--and in pressing the question whether philosophy as we know it can avoid a deflective substitution of 'a painless intellectual surrogate for real disturbance' (as Hacking defines Diamond's notion of deflection [60]).