deadhead

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deadhead

1. verb To drive a vehicle that is empty of freight or passengers. Can you deadhead this truck back to its point of origin?
2. noun One who is regarded as dumb, dull, or stupid. Did you see the guy who's wearing two different shoes? What a deadhead.
3. noun A fan of the rock band the Grateful Dead. I used to be a deadhead when I was younger, but I've lost interest in the Grateful Dead over the years.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

deadhead

1. n. a stupid person. Wow, are you a deadhead!
2. tv. & in. [for someone] to return an empty truck, train, airplane, etc., to where it came from. I deadheaded back to Los Angeles.
3. n. a follower of the rock group the Grateful Dead. My son is a deadhead and travels all over listening to these guys.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Deadheading is a constant chore that is easy to do habitually and very rewarding in its results, so make the most of those garden walks.
Examples of plants whose flower stems need deadheading include armeria, coreopsis (shear off flowers when there are too many to pick off by hand), dianthus, gaillardia, geum, purple coneflower, red-hot poker, rudbeckia, scabiosa, Shasta daisy, and veronica.
It's easy to keep up with deadheading on plants with flowers that fade slowly, such as marigolds and zinnias.
In the case of the latter, it may go a step beyond just deadheading.
Depending on the type of bloom stalk, deadheading may require the total removal of the flowering stalk, as in snapdragons and gladioli, or only the cutting off of the individual flower, as with marigolds.
They are self-cleaning so no deadheading is required.
If we neglect the deadheading chore, not only does the plant's appearance suffer aesthetically but the future direction of plant development has been altered.
Deadheading of shrubs in particular is almost guaranteed to double the bloom display next year.
Deadheading also causes plants to branch, and more stems mean more flowers.
Continue deadheading throughout the remainder of the season.
The first and easiest task to accomplish is deadheading (removal) of the faded blooms.
Hardy geraniums will benefit from daily deadheading at the moment, as well as all your bedding plants like petunia and argyranthemums.
First of all, deadheading. Once the flower has been pollinated and is past its best in terms of looks and fragrance, cut it off.
Expert rose growers don't allow damaged, diseased or tainted roses on a bush, removing them while deadheading liberally.