deadhead

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deadhead

1. n. a stupid person. Wow, are you a deadhead!
2. tv. & in. [for someone] to return an empty truck, train, airplane, etc., to where it came from. I deadheaded back to Los Angeles.
3. n. a follower of the rock group the Grateful Dead. My son is a deadhead and travels all over listening to these guys.
References in periodicals archive ?
True, you can never keep up completely with deadheading and there is no use driving yourself crazy with the effort.
Examples of plants whose flower stems need deadheading include armeria, coreopsis (shear off flowers when there are too many to pick off by hand), dianthus, gaillardia, geum, purple coneflower, red-hot poker, rudbeckia, scabiosa, Shasta daisy, and veronica.
It's easy to keep up with deadheading on plants with flowers that fade slowly, such as marigolds and zinnias.
In the case of the latter, it may go a step beyond just deadheading.
Depending on the type of bloom stalk, deadheading may require the total removal of the flowering stalk, as in snapdragons and gladioli, or only the cutting off of the individual flower, as with marigolds.
If we neglect the deadheading chore, not only does the plant's appearance suffer aesthetically but the future direction of plant development has been altered.
Ideally, deadheading should be done immediately after the flower fades.
Although it may be hot, you can still spend a little time mulching, composting, weeding and deadheading, preferably in the early morning or later evening when the temperatures are pleasant.
Continue deadheading throughout the remainder of the season.
The first and easiest task to accomplish is deadheading (removal) of the faded blooms.
Malibu or Coldwater canyons), we are told that ``numerous seeds are produced and requires deadheading to impede spread.
The colours of azalea and rhododendron are enhanced by deadheading (don't forget to compost the flowers).
Expert rose growers don't allow damaged, diseased or tainted roses on a bush, removing them while deadheading liberally.
Deadhead daffodils as they fade and keep winter bedding such as primulas and pansies looking good by regular deadheading.