dead-stick landing


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dead-stick landing

The landing of an air or space craft without power (i.e., one whose control stick is "dead"). (Also written as "deadstick landing.") After the storm knocked out both of the plane's engines, the pilot was forced to performed a harrowing dead-stick landing.
See also: landing
References in periodicals archive ?
(37) Even the top-scoring ace from Guadalcanal, Captain Foss (credited with five victories in one day and 26 victories overall) was shot down and performed a dead-stick landing at Henderson Field.
He destroyed four hostile fighters before cannon shellfire forced him to make a dead-stick landing off Vella Lavella, where he was later picked up."
Mikelsons calmly lined up on a cornfield and did a smooth, dead-stick landing. His passengers, hysterical with relief, jumped on him, hugged him, slapped him on the back and rewarded him for saving their lives by stuffing his pockets with their expense-account money.
The instructor declared an emergency and returned to the field, where he executed a dead-stick landing and coasted to a taxiway to be towed in.
When the pressure did not recover after returning to one G flight he snapped towards Nellis Air Force Base and climbed in order to achieve an energy state from which he could perform a dead-stick landing should the engine seize due to oil starvation.
In fact, few powered-aircraft pilots ever experience a true, total, no-power-at-all, dead-stick landing. Simulated engine-out approaches don't count--and most instructors give back power well before the trainee has to commit to landing.
With the extra time, was also able to begin discussion on what would be needed to push the U-2 off of the runway once I landed -- we both assumed the best results from my upcoming dead-stick landing attempt.
Smoke filled the cabin of a Cessna 180 on skis shortly after takeoff, resulting in dead-stick landing. The smoke likely was due to oil spilled on the engine in 30-degree-be-low-zero weather.
Or the engine is stopped and you're flying toward a dead-stick landing. When practiced, the typical instructional technique follows the old PTS outline: Once the desired configuration (gear, flaps, etc.) is established, reduce power slowly while simultaneously raising the nose to maintain altitude.
Early on in my flying career, taking off automatically meant, absolutely free, one mandatory dead-stick landing. That's because I was flying hang gliders and developed an easy appreciation for fitting into small spaces.
Consider the 175-hour West Virginia pilot who liked to practice dead-stick landings. As he had done several times before, he cut the ignition approaching base.