a dead cat bounce

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dead cat bounce

A sign that something is healthy or recovering, when in fact the thing is already on its way to ruin, collapse, or stagnation. Used particularly in reference to financial issues. (Based on the figurative notion that a dead cat will still bounce after a large fall.) Analysts are warning investors that the sudden spike in the currency's value is a dead-cat bounce, a natural and predictable rally after a heavy sell-off.
See also: bounce, cat, dead
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

a dead cat bounce

a misleading sign of vitality in something that is really moribund. informal
A dead cat might bounce if it is dropped from a great height: the fact of it bouncing does not reliably indicate that the cat is alive after all. The expression was coined in the late 20th century by Wall Street traders to refer to a situation in which a stock or company on a long-term, irrevocable downward trend suddenly shows a small temporary improvement.
See also: bounce, cat, dead
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
But Ishaq Siddiqi, market strategist at ETX Capital, warned there may be worse to come: "Today's price action in Europe is merely a dead-cat bounce and this rally is likely to lose steam."
Despite their best efforts to push the market back up from their current low levels, Owners have not been able to see anything more than a mild dead-cat bounce in Transatlantic rates for now, with MRS fixing around ws147.5 for UKC/USAC basis 37kt.
The proverbial dead-cat bounce - when freefall stops and inventories run out, causing output to pick up a bit - was misinterpreted as evidence of a V-shaped recovery: sharply down and sharply back up.
As for the rally in global stocks last month, many think it is a "dead-cat bounce," as companies are expected to report terrible earnings in the first quarter.
That the joys of 2001 were merely a dead-cat bounce that told us little about Houllier's ability to win the big one, the only one, thePremiership crown?
Well, dead-cat bounce made it into the business and law section: "n [from the facetious notion that even a dead cat would bounce slightly if dropped from a sufficient height] (1985): a brief and insignificant recovery (as of stock prices) after a steep decline." Chin music means either idle talk or "a usu.
It could be some late, last-gasp cultural tendency, a kind of postmodern dead-cat bounce, or it might be a marketing tag designed to evoke a mood and excite demand for an offering of year-end schlock.
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Developed market (DM) equities are less than 6% off their all-time highs, while emerging market (EM) stocks staged nothing short of a dead-cat bounce and are more than 10% off their recent peak.
The group has also seen an element of "dead-cat bounce" in the US, with advertising as a proportion of US GDP reaching a low in 2009 not seen since the mid-1970s.
"Almost everyone believes that what we've seen is a dead-cat bounce," or a fleeting round of gains in a bear market, said Kent Engelke, managing director at Capitol Securities Management in Glen Allen, Va, Market Watch reported.
Barclays said the 1980s, the so-called decade that loved money, was a particularly fruitful era for new terms, with wonga, the need to be ``holding folding'' and the market term dead-cat bounce all owing their existence to this time.