dead serious


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dead serious

Very serious. This phrase is usually used as an intensifier to implore the listener to believe the speaker. I'm dead serious—stop playing tricks on me!
See also: dead, serious

dead serious

absolutely serious; not joking. Tom: You're funning me. Bill: No, I'm dead serious. Mary has threatened divorce a hundred times, but this time she says she's dead serious.
See also: dead, serious
References in periodicals archive ?
My dad asked me after the first game - he's 90 years, and he's dead serious - 'Johnny, do you guys teach tackling?
21, says he has "experienced death", he is dead serious.
So we have the World Club Challenge, that is dead serious.
T]he next day I sent her a text and said I was dead serious about the jewelry for the show, if you're into it.
Walked around dead serious, somber," Jesus responds.
When Motorola supported Phonebloks' modular smartphone concept, it pretty much said to the rest of the industry that the Google-owned firm was dead serious about customization.
University Professor Biljana Vankovska comments for Nova Makedonija about the spy scandal that shook the country and writes that even the wittiest columnists are dead serious when the national security is at issue.
The National Express West Midlands bus driver is dead serious about the challenge, which will raise funds for Birmingham Dogs Home.
But even if this is playacting--hyperbolic, idealistic, romantic, comic--it is also dead serious, a life-and-death battle with her creative dreams and demons.
However, though the entrepreneur may be dead serious about the potential profitability of his canned air products, he has stressed that this air venture is also about calling attention to a critical issue facing China.
But for all our onstage antics, we were always dead serious about our music.
While saying Pyongyang was aware that former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, the successor to Koizumi, was dead serious about resolving the abduction issue, Nakayama expressed concern about the present government of Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda.
It looked dead serious from the amount of bobbies that were there.
But when it came to figuring out how to reproduce the moment in the first-act finale of Newsies when the set slides to the front of the stage as the music swells, Phillip George, a director of Forbidden Broadway, turned dead serious.