dead and gone


Also found in: Acronyms.

dead and gone

Completely gone or defunct. The phrase can be used to refer to one who has literally died and been buried, as well as to something unsuccessful. Their father is dead and gone, but they still complain about him daily. Oh, that idea from last week's meeting is dead and gone now that the CEO has vetoed it.
See also: and, dead, gone
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

dead and gone

 
1. Lit. [of a person] long dead. Old Gert's been dead and gone for quite a spell. When I'm dead and gone, I hope folks remember me at my best.
2. Fig. [of a thing] gone long ago. That kind of thinking is dead and gone. The horse-and-buggy days are dead and gone.
See also: and, dead, gone
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dead and ˈburied/ˈgone

dead, especially for a long time; long past and forgotten: Long after I’m dead and gone, you’ll still be carrying on the same as you ever were.Why bring up old disagreements that have been dead and buried for years?
See also: and, bury, dead, gone
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

dead and gone

1. mod. [of a person] long dead. Old Gert’s been dead and gone for quite a spell.
2. mod. [of a thing] gone long ago. That kind of thinking is dead and gone.
See also: and, dead, gone
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

dead and gone

Permanently absent. While this expression seems tautological as uttered by Ophelia, driven mad by terrible events (“He is dead and gone, lady, he is dead and gone; at his head a grass-green turf; at his heels a stone,” she sings to the queen in Hamlet, 4.5), it has another implication as well. “Not dead but gone before,” wrote Matthew Henry in his biblical commentary (1710)—that is, going on to a presumably glorious afterlife. Nevertheless, the sense of “gone forever” prevailed. The phrase was probably a cliché by the time Dickens wrote, “When she was dead and gone, perhaps they would be sorry” (Barnaby Rudge, 1840).
See also: and, dead, gone
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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