day of doom


Also found in: Acronyms.

day of doom

1. The end of the world; judgment day. Every year, another nut job comes on the air, talking about how we're coming close to the day of doom and that we must all repent our sins.
2. By extension, any moment characterized by catastrophe, disaster, or complete ruination. The day of doom in my life was the day my daughter was killed by a drunk driver. It was a day of doom on Wall Street, as the property bubble burst and the economy plummeted to historic lows.
See also: doom, of
References in periodicals archive ?
After all, the five-digit solution - or any other solution you contemplate - will also have its very own day of doom associated with it.
A modern edition of The Day of Doom prepared by Kenneth B.
In 1662 his volume The Day of Doom, accurately labeled in its subtitle A Poetical Description of the Great and Last Judgement, was published.
Similarly, <IR> MICHAEL WIGGLESWORTH's </IR> The Day of Doom, a best seller in the 17th century, continued to be popular for 150 years.
In 1662 he published his most popular poem, The Day of Doom, based on a dream he had had nine days earlier.
examines how even the most rigid Congregationalists could dip into poetry now and again, as evidenced by the brisk sales of Wigglesworth's The Day of Doom, which contained such a definite conflict between content and meter that it became safe.
When the Normans conquered England, St Mary the Virgin was included in the Domesday Book - and now another day of doom has dawned.
Some 20 years ago when he was studying the Salem witch trials - a study that resulted in the book he co-wrote with historian Paul Boyer, ``Salem Possessed: The Social Origins of Witchcraft'' - Nissenbaum was struck by the contrast between the best-known American poem of the 1600s and 1700s, ``The Day of Doom,'' and ``The Night Before Christmas.
The parallel between The Day of Doom and Rachel Carson's 1962 environmental classic Silent Spring has been drawn by several scholars.
In poetry one funds early examples such as Michael Wigglesworth's <IR> THE DAY OF DOOM </IR> (1662), but often its ecstatic Calvinism, as in Jonathan Edwards, reached poetic heights in prose more strikingly than in verse.