day of doom


Also found in: Acronyms.

day of doom

1. The end of the world; judgment day. Every year, another nut job comes on the air, talking about how we're coming close to the day of doom and that we must all repent our sins.
2. By extension, any moment characterized by catastrophe, disaster, or complete ruination. The day of doom in my life was the day my daughter was killed by a drunk driver. It was a day of doom on Wall Street, as the property bubble burst and the economy plummeted to historic lows.
See also: doom, of
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In The Sacrificial Body and the Day of Doom, Urszula Szulakowska examines these images and the texts that accompanied them, arguing that they should be understood in the context of a radical apocalyptic Reformation theology.
After all, the five-digit solution - or any other solution you contemplate - will also have its very own day of doom associated with it.
The first two were appended to The Day of Doom: or a Poetical Description of the Great and Last Judgment (1662), a long poem in ballad measure using horrific imagery to describe the Last Judgment.
In 1662 his volume The Day of Doom, accurately labeled in its subtitle A Poetical Description of the Great and Last Judgement, was published.
In poetry one funds early examples such as Michael Wigglesworth's <IR> THE DAY OF DOOM </IR> (1662), but often its ecstatic Calvinism, as in Jonathan Edwards, reached poetic heights in prose more strikingly than in verse.
In 1662 he published his most popular poem, The Day of Doom, based on a dream he had had nine days earlier.
Morris (English and American literature, Cambridge U.) examines how even the most rigid Congregationalists could dip into poetry now and again, as evidenced by the brisk sales of Wigglesworth's The Day of Doom, which contained such a definite conflict between content and meter that it became safe.
It was called the Day of Doom and churches were packed in terror.
When the Normans conquered England, St Mary the Virgin was included in the Domesday Book - and now another day of doom has dawned.
This poem, entitled The Day of Doom: or a Poetical Description of the Great and Last Judgment, versified Puritan doctrine and became an immediate best seller in Massachusetts.
Wigglesworth's chief claim to fame, <IR> THE DAY OF DOOM </IR> (1662), sets forth the Puritan views of predestination, original sin, and God's grace and punishment.
Yesterday, my newspaper had the death of three local firemen and the impeachment vote on the front - the rival New York Post had 'Bill's Day of Doom' all over Page One.
Similarly, <IR> MICHAEL WIGGLESWORTH's </IR> The Day of Doom, a best seller in the 17th century, continued to be popular for 150 years.