darken

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darken a church door

To attend church or a service therein. I was raised Catholic, but I haven't darkened a church door since I was 15 years old.
See also: church, darken, door

darken (one's) door

To visit one as an unwelcome guest. I can't believe she darkened our door and stayed for hours, even though I clearly wanted her to leave!
See also: darken, door

never darken (one's) door again

To never return to one's home. Don't worry, I've made sure that he'll never darken our door again.
See also: again, darken, door, never

never darken (one's) doorstep again

To never return to one's home. Don't worry, I've made sure that he'll never darken our doorstep again.
See also: again, darken, doorstep, never

never darken (one's) doorway again

To never return to one's home. Don't worry, I've made sure that he'll never darken our doorway again.
See also: again, darken, never

not darken the doorstep of (someplace)

To not go or never return to some place. I heard the Justice Department is dropping the case, so it looks like he won't be darkening the doorstep of the courthouse anytime soon. I haven't darkened the doorstep of a church since I was 10 years old.
See also: darken, doorstep, not, of

not darken the door of (someplace)

To not go or never return to some place. I heard the Justice Department is dropping the case, so it looks like he won't be darkening the door of the courthouse anytime soon. I haven't darkened the door of a church since I was 10 years old.
See also: darken, door, not, of

not darken (one's) door again

To never return to someone's home; to be banished by someone. Don't worry, I've made sure that he won't darken our door again.
See also: again, darken, door, not

darken someone's door

Fig. [for an unwelcome person] to come to someone's door seeking entry. (As if the visitor were casting a shadow on the door. Formal, or even jocular.) Who is this who has come to darken my door? She pointed to the street and said, "Go and never darken my door again!"
See also: darken, door

darken someone's door

Come unwanted to someone's home, as in I told him to get out and never darken my door again. The verb darken here refers to casting one's shadow across the threshold, a word that occasionally was substituted for door. As an imperative, the expression is associated with Victorian melodrama, where someone (usually a young woman or man) is thrown out of the parental home for some misdeed, but it is actually much older. Benjamin Franklin used it in The Busybody (1729): "I am afraid she would resent it so as never to darken my doors again."
See also: darken, door

never darken someone's door

or

never darken someone's doorstep

OLD-FASHIONED
If someone tells you never to darken their door again or never to darken their doorstep again, they are ordering you never to visit them again. The law firm told them to destroy all dossiers and never darken their doorstep again.
See also: darken, door, never

not darken somewhere's door

or

not darken somewhere's doorstep

OLD-FASHIONED
If someone never goes to a place, you can say that they do not darken its door or do not darken its doorstep. He had not darkened the door of a church for a long time. Plenty more cases never darken the doorstep of a courthouse. Note: The image here is of someone's dark shadow falling across the door.
See also: darken, door, not

never darken someone's door (or doorstep)

keep away from someone's home permanently.
1988 Salman Rushdie The Satanic Verses They couldn't lock her away in any old folks' home, sent her whole family packing when they dared to suggest it, never darken her doorstep, she told them, cut the whole lot off without a penny or a by your leave.
See also: darken, door, never

not/never darken somebody’s ˌdoor aˈgain

(old-fashioned or humorous) not/never come to somebody’s home again because you are not welcome: Go! And never darken my door again!
See also: again, darken, door, never, not
References in periodicals archive ?
The post Sunderland woes force Moyes into darkened room appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
SPORTY: The Toyota Auris SR 180 has lowered suspension, a rear spoiler, 17-inch alloys and darkened windows for a more sporting look.
Seurat's darkened zinc yellow also absorbed other wavelengths.
The GT Sport is also fitted with darkened head lamps, tinted rear windows and 17-inch alloy wheels.
4-litre Sport model and costs pounds 15,990 with 16 inch steel wheels, air conditioning and darkened windows.
The colors in the painting are somber tones of ochre, brown, black, gray, and white, further darkened by the fact that the artist also set fire to certain areas of the canvas.
Fistula bends sludge and crusty darkened thrash with infectious blasting riffs.
Their moods darkened, though, when they realized that new internet applications, which were intended to accommodate more website traffic for online registration and other administrative tasks, would overload the existing servers.
Elaborating on those ideas, the artist suggested that 'a moving camera obscura image in the interior of a darkened, itinerant, nineteenth-century horse-drawn carriage' would have constituted a prefiguration of the cinema, had such a thing existed.
James MacMillan's gigues, waltzes, and lonely Satie-like piano music were darkened by sirens and rumbles.
And to make this seem like a nightclub on wheels, the darkened glass is edged with red LED lighting.
Since 1966, when he transformed his Santa Monica studio into an artwork by meticulously arranging natural and artificial light sources, James Turrell has made works composed almost exclusively of light cast on, around, and into architectural spaces: open-air rooms for viewing the changing sky, darkened spaces into which light emanates through window-like apertures, and large-scale walk-in environments.
The vigil centres on readings from the writings and lives of the saints in a darkened chapel, followed by Gregorian and Russian chant by the Dominican Schola Cantorum.
The blackout of the East Coast--which ranged as far west as Ohio, and as far east as Connecticut--knocked out power and communications to millions, and sent workers in darkened offices home early.
During the robbery, he had poked one darkened end of the roughly six-inch object through a small hole in one of his pockets to give it the appearance of a gun.