darken (one's) door

(redirected from darken my door)

darken (one's) door

To come to one's home as an unwelcome visitor. I made sure he'll never dark our door again.
See also: darken, door
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

darken someone's door

Fig. [for an unwelcome person] to come to someone's door seeking entry. (As if the visitor were casting a shadow on the door. Formal, or even jocular.) Who is this who has come to darken my door? She pointed to the street and said, "Go and never darken my door again!"
See also: darken, door
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

darken someone's door

Come unwanted to someone's home, as in I told him to get out and never darken my door again. The verb darken here refers to casting one's shadow across the threshold, a word that occasionally was substituted for door. As an imperative, the expression is associated with Victorian melodrama, where someone (usually a young woman or man) is thrown out of the parental home for some misdeed, but it is actually much older. Benjamin Franklin used it in The Busybody (1729): "I am afraid she would resent it so as never to darken my doors again."
See also: darken, door
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
Not a man of them shall ever darken my doors again!"
One MP said: The message was clear - don''t darken my door if you vote against me.
Dogs will not likely ever darken my door except if police come to my home with one to search if they think I am dumb enough to keep a stash of nearly legal Massachusetts marijuana in my closet.
As he threatened - live on national radio - to hang up and vowed never to darken my door again, I kept up my bombardment, reminding him that I was not one of his subordinates and that now he is an MP he must get used to the fact that we common 5/8ths insist upon our two-pennyworth.
As yet ``the authorities'', which some readers threatened to report me to for inciting racial hatred, have yet to darken my door.
After a stern lecture, I warned them to tell their mates never to darken my door again.
The incidental music sounds like Duffy's hit Mercy, the hotel is straight from the "don't darken my door again" book of Scottish cliches and the token bad guy is bald and black.
The ones that don't may never darken my door again.