dare

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do a dare

To do something risky or courageous at someone else's urging, as during children's games like Truth or Dare. A: "Ugh, I don't want to do a dare either." B: "Betsy, it's Truth or Dare—you have to do one or the other."
See also: dare

don't you dare

An emphatic way to tell someone not to do something. Don't you dare say something vulgar like that to your mother! Don't you dare touch that autographed baseball—it's worth a lot of money!
See also: dare

how dare (someone)

Used to express shock, disdain, or anger that someone could do something so presumptuous, brazen, or rude. Can be said as a question or an exclamation. How dare you speak to your mother that way? Apologize right now! How dare they accuse our company of tax fraud, after the amount of jobs and revenue we've brought into the economy!
See also: dare, how

how dare you

What you have done is unacceptable. The phrase is sometimes followed by the action in question. How dare you speak to your mother that way? Apologize right now. You think you can brazenly cheat and get away with it? How dare you?
See also: dare, how

I dare be bound

obsolete I am or feel totally certain (of something). Faith, I dare be bound that Master Wilkins will yet prove himself a worthy successor to the family title. A: "What say you, Thomas? Do you think Mr. Wilson was involved." B: "Oh, I dare be bound for that, sir. I saw him with my own two eyes."
See also: bound, dare

I dare say

I assume, assert, or am quite certain. (Somewhat formal or old-fashioned.) I dare say we'll hear from him again before the year is done. These trips are always rather tedious, but I dare say we'll be able to find something to divert our attention.
See also: dare, say

You wouldn't dare!

An exclamation of defiant, incredulous disbelief regarding something that someone has threatened to do. A: "I'll give you till the end of the week to move out. After that, we're going to start throwing your stuff on the curb." B: "You wouldn't dare! You touch anything I own, and I'll sue the pants off you!" A: "Either withdraw from the election, or I'll share these incriminating photos with the press—and your wife!" B: "You slime bag—you wouldn't dare!" A: "Oh, believe me, I would."
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

dare someone (to do something)

to challenge someone to do something. Sally dared Jane to race her to the corner. You wouldn't do that, would you? I dare you.

You wouldn't dare (to do something)!

an exclamation that shows disbelief about something that the speaker has stated an intention of doing. Bill: I'm going to leave school. Tom: You wouldn't dare leave! Bill: Be quiet or I'll slap you. Jane: You wouldn't dare to slap me!
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

I dare say

1. I venture to assert or affirm, as in I dare say my point of view will be heard. [c. 1300]
2. Also, I daresay. I presume or assume to be likely, as in I daresay you'll be invited. This usage is more common in Britain than in America. [Mid-1700s]
See also: dare, say
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

don’t you ˈdare (do something)!

(spoken) used to tell somebody strongly not to do something: ‘I’ll tell her about it.’ ‘Don’t you dare!’Don’t you dare say anything to anybody.

how ˈdare you, etc.

(spoken) used for expressing anger or shock about something that somebody has done: How dare you speak to me like that!How dare he use my office without permission?
See also: dare, how

I dare ˈsay

(spoken) I suppose; it seems probable: I dare say what you say is true, but it’s too late to change our plans now.
See also: dare, say
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
I dare to believe that women of this country will stand out and refuse to be oppressed and exploited.
I dare to believe that the youth of this country will take charge of the nation and preserve the universal values of pluralism, non-violence, dignity of human beings, freedom and friendship to promote the universal family spirit, Vasudaiva kutumbakam.
Reinhart also chose a dare that was read to her by Apa.
In a study on dare in OE, Tomaszewska (2014: 68f) writes that while the verb usually took the infinitive without to, to-infinitives are occasionally found.
In the coming weeks, other Today FM presenters, including Anton Savage, Dermot & Dave, Matt Cooper and Louise Duffy will be forced to reveal what they're prepared to do for Dare To Care.
(10) Then let them all encircle him about, And Fairy-like to pinch the vncleane Knight; And aske him why that houre of Fairy Reuell, In their so sacred pathes, he dares to tread In shapeprophane.
Mad Malla, was the fearless, brainless, skinheeded leader of the special studies squad who spent five years just digging the school gardens - no dare was too dangerous or unpleasant to this boy.
Dare to Move 6 Remix is still accepting high school dance groups and amateur DJ participants.
They still dare to make promises and care enough to keep the promises they make.
AN EXHIBITION will be held on the 60th anniversary of comic book hero Dan Dare.
Then, as a result of another dare, the pair get a back, sack and crack wax.
Their series I Dare Ya bursts onto screens tomorrow on RTE Two.
BRAND new comedy show that sees two young standups performing dares sent by the public to their website, www.idareya.ie.
The most widely used school-based substance abuse prevention program in the United States is the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) program, which is funded by a variety of sources, including private, federal, and other public entities.