I dare say

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I dare say

I assume, assert, or am quite certain. (Somewhat formal or old-fashioned.) I dare say we'll hear from him again before the year is done. These trips are always rather tedious, but I dare say we'll be able to find something to divert our attention.
See also: dare, say
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

I dare say

1. I venture to assert or affirm, as in I dare say my point of view will be heard. [c. 1300]
2. Also, I daresay. I presume or assume to be likely, as in I daresay you'll be invited. This usage is more common in Britain than in America. [Mid-1700s]
See also: dare, say
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

I dare ˈsay

(spoken) I suppose; it seems probable: I dare say what you say is true, but it’s too late to change our plans now.
See also: dare, say
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in classic literature ?
I dare say I should find their pose now a little old- fashioned.
"I dare say you are, and I am sure I do not at all wonder at it.
The stranger was one of the parlor-boarders, I dare say. I gathered from the first words you exchanged together, that you had met in the passage -she on her way downstairs, and you on your way in from the back garden.
They look upon it as quite their own, I dare say, whenever that happens."
'I'm not clear about that; but I dare say she will do her best to make them comfortable in body and mind, in accordance with our mother's example.'
They promised to come at twelve, only it rained; but now, as it is so fine, I dare say they will be here soon."
"I dare say you do, but we are all too careless about our English.
"You had better order the carriage directly, my love," said she; "I dare say we shall be able to get along, if we set off directly; and if we do come to any thing very bad, I can get out and walk.
Change of air and care will keep you well, I dare say, or if it does not entirely, you will have the fever more lightly.
"My dear Tom," cried his aunt soon afterwards, "as you are not dancing, I dare say you will have no objection to join us in a rubber; shall you?" Then leaving her seat, and coming to him to enforce the proposal, added in a whisper, "We want to make a table for Mrs.
"Very ingenious, I dare say. The doctor doesn't quite satisfy me, however, for all that.
But I dare say I could do dogs and horses if I was to try more," he added, reflecting that Philip might falsely suppose that he was going to "knock under," if he were too frank about the imperfection of his accomplishments.
"He is as indifferent to the honour of knowing me, I dare say, as I am to the honour of knowing him.
but I dare say you did all for the best, and there is no defying destiny.
--Giving a party to the last arrived harpooneers, I dare say, gay as a frigate's pennant, and so am I--fa, la!