I dare say

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I dare say

I assume, assert, or am quite certain. (Somewhat formal or old fashioned.) I dare say we'll hear from him again before the year is done. These trips are always rather tedious, but I dare say we'll be able to find something to divert our attention.
See also: dare, say

I dare say

1. I venture to assert or affirm, as in I dare say my point of view will be heard. [c. 1300]
2. Also, I daresay. I presume or assume to be likely, as in I daresay you'll be invited. This usage is more common in Britain than in America. [Mid-1700s]
See also: dare, say

I dare ˈsay

(spoken) I suppose; it seems probable: I dare say what you say is true, but it’s too late to change our plans now.
See also: dare, say
References in classic literature ?
I dare say I should find their pose now a little old- fashioned.
Slowly it seemed then, but I dare say it was fast enough; and there is always this consolation to be whispered in the ear of wounded vanity, that the world's memory is equally bad for failure and success; that if it will not keep your triumphs in mind as you think it ought, neither will it long dwell upon your defeats.
I dare say you are, and I am sure I do not at all wonder at it.
She means well, poor soul -- I dare say she means well.
I'm not clear about that; but I dare say she will do her best to make them comfortable in body and mind, in accordance with our mother's example.
They promised to come at twelve, only it rained; but now, as it is so fine, I dare say they will be here soon.
I dare say he never did, because I understand that diplomatists, in and out of the career, take themselves and their tricks with an exemplary seriousness.
Yet that is considered an excellent school, I find, and I dare say it would be if the benighted lady did not think it necessary to cram her pupils like Thanks-giving turkeys, instead of feeding them in a natural and wholesome way.
You had better order the carriage directly, my love," said she; "I dare say we shall be able to get along, if we set off directly; and if we do come to any thing very bad, I can get out and walk.
Change of air and care will keep you well, I dare say, or if it does not entirely, you will have the fever more lightly.
My dear Tom," cried his aunt soon afterwards, "as you are not dancing, I dare say you will have no objection to join us in a rubber; shall you?
But I dare say I could do dogs and horses if I was to try more," he added, reflecting that Philip might falsely suppose that he was going to "knock under," if he were too frank about the imperfection of his accomplishments.
He is as indifferent to the honour of knowing me, I dare say, as I am to the honour of knowing him.
but I dare say you did all for the best, and there is no defying destiny.
Giving a party to the last arrived harpooneers, I dare say, gay as a frigate's pennant, and so am I--fa, la