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a little knowledge is a dangerous thing

proverb Having a precursory or limited amount of knowledge about something can make one overestimate how well they will be able to do something much larger in scope or scale. Just because she painted her room by herself, now she thinks she can do the entire house—inside and out! A little knowledge is a dangerous thing, I tell you.

a little learning is a dangerous thing

proverb Having a precursory or limited amount of learning about something can make one overestimate how well they will be able to do something much larger in scope or scale. Just because she painted her room by herself, now she thinks she can do the entire house—inside and out! A little learning is a dangerous thing, I tell you.

armed and dangerous

Possessing a weapon and likely to use it. Typically said of criminals, especially fugitives. The most wanted fugitives on this list are all considered armed and dangerous.
See also: and, arm, dangerous

dangerous ground

A topic or opinion that is likely to upset or offend others. I may be on dangerous ground with this opinion, but, as a mother myself, I really don't think women should breastfeed in public.
See also: dangerous, ground

diseases of the soul are more dangerous than those of the body

proverb Mental and emotional pain is more painful and more difficult to treat than a physical ailment. The quote is attributed to Marcus Tullius Cicero, a Roman statesman and philosopher. Therapists and psychiatrists are vitally important to our society. Diseases of the soul are more dangerous than those of the body, after all.

live dangerously

To lead a lifestyle characterized by taking risks. Sometimes used humorously to refer to a very mildly risky action. Most of the guys I know who live dangerously eventually get tired of life in the fast lane and end up settling down. A: "Extra hot sauce?" B: "Yeah, I like to live dangerously."
See also: dangerously, live

on dangerous ground

In a position that poses danger to oneself or is likely to upset or offend others. I may be on dangerous ground with this opinion, but, as a mother myself, I really don't think women should breastfeed in public. You're on dangerous ground as long as you continue to antagonize him—I've seen him become violent.
See also: dangerous, ground, on

on shaky ground

Questionable or lacking support, as of an idea. His hypothesis has been on shaky ground to since the beginning, so I'm not surprised that he couldn't prove it in the lab.
See also: ground, on, shaky
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

*armed and dangerous

Cliché [of someone who is suspected of a crime] having a gun or other lethal weapon and not being reluctant to use it. (This is part of a warning to police officers who might try to capture an armed suspect. *Typically: be ~; be regarded as ~; be presumed to be ~.) The murderer is at large, presumed to be armed and dangerous. The suspect has killed once and is armed and dangerous.
See also: and, arm, dangerous

little knowledge is a dangerous thing

 and little learning is a dangerous thing
Prov. Cliché If you only know a little about something, you may feel you are qualified to make judgments when, in fact, you are not. After Bill read one book on the history of Venezuela, he felt he was an authority on the subject, but he wound up looking like a fool in discussions with people who knew a lot more about it than he did. A little learning is a dangerous thing.

on shaky ground

 and on dangerous ground
Fig. [of an idea or proposal] on an unstable or questionable foundation; [of an idea or proposal] founded on a risky premise. When you suggest that we are to blame, you are on shaky ground. There is no evidence that we are at fault. The case for relying solely on nuclear energy seems to be on dangerous ground.
See also: ground, on, shaky
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

little knowledge is a dangerous thing, a

Also, a little learning is a dangerous thing. Knowing a little about something tempts one to overestimate one's abilities. For example, I know you've assembled furniture, but that doesn't mean you can build an entire wall system; remember, a little knowledge . This maxim, originally a line from Alexander Pope's An Essay on Criticism (1709), has been repeated with slight variations ever since. It is still heard, although less frequently, and sometimes shortened, as in the example.

live dangerously

Take numerous risks, be daring, as in Bill never knows if he'll have enough money to pay the next month's rent-he likes to live dangerously . This expression figured in the work of such 19th-century German writers as Nietzsche, who regarded it as an admirable course of action. Today it is often used with mildly humorous effect, as in the example. [c. 1900]
See also: dangerously, live
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dangerous ˈground

a situation or subject that is likely to make somebody angry, or that involves risk: We’d be on dangerous ground if we asked about race or religion.
See also: dangerous, ground
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

little learning is a dangerous thing, a

Knowing a little may make one mistakenly assume that one knows everything. This expression is a direct quotation from Alexander Pope’s Essay on Criticism (1709), which echoed a sentiment stated in the sixteenth century by the French essayist Montaigne.
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Having determined that Code 19.2-182.5 requires a finding of current mental illness and a showing of future dangerousness, as required by the Due Process Clause, the court must determine whether the Commonwealth met that burden."
Public conceptions of mental illness: Labels, causes, dangerousness, and social distance.
Part II reviews current state statutes and trends relating to civil commitment, including dangerousness and gravely disabled grounds.
The growing belief that people with mental illness are violent: The role of the dangerousness criterion for civil commitment.
In February, Quijano told The Texas Tribune that he never said Buck would be a continuing threat to society, and that the statements about race were meant to show that there was a "relational" connection between race and dangerousness, not a "causal" connection.
Part III then considers how the dangerousness inquiry in the terrorism context might play out, and why the domestic version of that inquiry is suited to the present context.
Paul Caulfield, defending, said: "I do invite the court to call for a pre-sentence report given the gravity of the offence and the need to assess dangerousness."
He was charged with "pre-crime social dangerousness," a charge often used against dissidents, because he was seen by Cuban authorities as posing a potential risk to society.
For readers familiar with the history of psychiatry, Ablard's chapters cover common territory, including debates over the rise of the asylum, the role that families played in negotiating committals and discharges, a proliferation of somatic therapies that grew out of an increased focus on neurology, the rise of "modern" psychopharmacological therapies, legal debates over responsibility and dangerousness, and eventually the rise of community-based treatment clinics.
All too often mental health professionals rely on "gut instinct" and neglect evidence-based strategies when assessing for dangerousness. Generally, I believe this to be an issue of complacency rather than willful neglect or lack of training.
(social research, criminology, and social statistics, Lancaster U., UK) address the importance of studying criminal behavior across the life-span rather than specific incidents, and discussing the major aspects of a criminal career--onset, persistence, desistance, and duration--as well as prediction, dangerousness, risk, and specialization factors.
role overload and the perceived dangerousness of the job
She bowed her head as Judge Neil McKittrick said her driving was of "almost breathtaking dangerousness."
And he told him: "The court has to consider among other things the issue of dangerousness.
In order of dangerousness, they are: Seventh Avenue and Jefferson Street; River Avenue at River Road; Seventh Avenue and Washington Street; 11th Avenue and Bailey Hill Road; and Coburg Road at Oakway Road.