dangerous

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armed and dangerous

Possessing a weapon and likely to use it. Typically said of criminals, especially fugitives. The most wanted fugitives on this list are all considered armed and dangerous.
See also: and, arm, dangerous

on shaky ground

Questionable or lacking support, as of an idea. His hypothesis has been on shaky ground to since the beginning, so I'm not surprised that he couldn't prove it in the lab.
See also: ground, on, shaky

live dangerously

To lead a lifestyle characterized by taking risks. Sometimes used humorously to refer to a very mildly risky action. Most of the guys I know who live dangerously eventually get tired of life in the fast lane and end up settling down. A: "Extra hot sauce?" B: "Yeah, I like to live dangerously."
See also: dangerously, live

on dangerous ground

In a position that poses danger to onself e or that is likely to upset or offend others. I may be on dangerous ground with this opinion, but, as a mother myself, I really don't think women should breastfeed in public. You're on dangerous ground as long as you continue to antagonize him—I've seen him become violent.
See also: dangerous, ground, on

dangerous ground

A topic or opinion that is likely to upset or offend others. I may be on dangerous ground with this opinion, but, as a mother myself, I really don't think women should breastfeed in public.
See also: dangerous, ground

a little learning is a dangerous thing

Having a precursory or limited amount of learning about something can make one overestimate how well they will be able to do something much larger in scope or scale. Just because she painted her room by herself, now she thinks she can do the entire house—inside and out! A little learning is a dangerous thing, I tell you.

a little knowledge is a dangerous thing

Having a precursory or limited amount of knowledge about something can make one overestimate how well they will be able to do something much larger in scope or scale. Just because she painted her room by herself, now she thinks she can do the entire house—inside and out! A little knowledge is a dangerous thing, I tell you.

*armed and dangerous

Cliché [of someone who is suspected of a crime] having a gun or other lethal weapon and not being reluctant to use it. (This is part of a warning to police officers who might try to capture an armed suspect. *Typically: be ~; be regarded as ~; be presumed to be ~.) The murderer is at large, presumed to be armed and dangerous. The suspect has killed once and is armed and dangerous.
See also: and, arm, dangerous

little knowledge is a dangerous thing

 and little learning is a dangerous thing
Prov. Cliché If you only know a little about something, you may feel you are qualified to make judgments when, in fact, you are not. After Bill read one book on the history of Venezuela, he felt he was an authority on the subject, but he wound up looking like a fool in discussions with people who knew a lot more about it than he did. A little learning is a dangerous thing.

on shaky ground

 and on dangerous ground
Fig. [of an idea or proposal] on an unstable or questionable foundation; [of an idea or proposal] founded on a risky premise. When you suggest that we are to blame, you are on shaky ground. There is no evidence that we are at fault. The case for relying solely on nuclear energy seems to be on dangerous ground.
See also: ground, on, shaky

little knowledge is a dangerous thing, a

Also, a little learning is a dangerous thing. Knowing a little about something tempts one to overestimate one's abilities. For example, I know you've assembled furniture, but that doesn't mean you can build an entire wall system; remember, a little knowledge . This maxim, originally a line from Alexander Pope's An Essay on Criticism (1709), has been repeated with slight variations ever since. It is still heard, although less frequently, and sometimes shortened, as in the example.

live dangerously

Take numerous risks, be daring, as in Bill never knows if he'll have enough money to pay the next month's rent-he likes to live dangerously . This expression figured in the work of such 19th-century German writers as Nietzsche, who regarded it as an admirable course of action. Today it is often used with mildly humorous effect, as in the example. [c. 1900]
See also: dangerously, live

dangerous ˈground

a situation or subject that is likely to make somebody angry, or that involves risk: We’d be on dangerous ground if we asked about race or religion.
See also: dangerous, ground

little learning is a dangerous thing, a

Knowing a little may make one mistakenly assume that one knows everything. This expression is a direct quotation from Alexander Pope’s Essay on Criticism (1709), which echoed a sentiment stated in the sixteenth century by the French essayist Montaigne.
References in periodicals archive ?
Predictions of future dangerousness are widely admissible without any judicial inquiry into their scientific validity.
Zarrella, a Rhode Island superior court held that when deciding if an acquittee should be released from PIAC, "medication and treatment should [not] be considered on the issue of either present sanity or dangerousness.
To determine perceived dangerousness, respondents were asked how likely the vignette subject was to hurt others.
We asked jurors two sets of questions with particular relevance to Virginia's scheme of capital sentencing, which focuses the jury's attention on the future dangerousness of the defendant and the vileness of the crime.
The Court also rejected South Carolina's contention that "evidence of future dangerousness counts under Simmons only when the prosection `introduces evidence for which there is no other possible inference but future dangerousness to society.
Part III first reviews findings from prior CJP research that underscore the central role future dangerousness plays in the decision making of capital jurors; it then presents additional results which, we believe, show that even when the prosecution is silent about the defendant's future dangerousness, future dangerousness is nonetheless "at issue" in virtually all capital cases.
This Article proposes that courts and psychiatrists go beyond a finding of dangerousness as a predicate for civil commitment, and instead interpret gravely disabled statutes to allow for commitment when an individual is unable to provide for her basic needs but does not pose a danger to herself.
The growing belief that people with mental illness are violent: The role of the dangerousness criterion for civil commitment.
Joan Huffman, R-Southside Place, asked Quijano, "You have determined that the sex factor, that a male is more violent than a female because that's just the way it is, and that the race factor, black, increases the future dangerousness for various complicated reasons; is that correct?
Barrister Christopher Tehrani, for Pullin, said he had admitted serious matters and conceded that the court would be concerned about the issue of dangerousness.
In its most basic form, the future dangerousness inquiry requires executive agents to make an evidentiary showing of individual-specific harmful conduct, or risk of harmful conduct, to the community such that a tribunal deems continued detention necessary to ensure the safety of the community.
The report will have to deal with the question of dangerousness," Judge Brian Forster said.
In response to US claims concerning the potential risks to human health of the diabetes drug Avandia, the European Commission recently ordered the European Agency for Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) to review the dangerousness of the medicine and to "report by October on the dangerousness of diabetes medicines containing rosiglitazone, namely Avandia, Avandamet and Avaglim".
Agreeing with the application the judge directed the report should specifically to consider dangerousness that Bevan poses to the public.
He was charged with "pre-crime social dangerousness," a charge often used against dissidents, because he was seen by Cuban authorities as posing a potential risk to society.