dandy

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Related to dandyism: dandies

fine and dandy

Fine; good. The phrase is often used sarcastically. Sure, Saturday afternoon is fine and dandy—see you then. Well, that's just fine and dandy—my car won't start!
See also: and, dandy, fine

jim-dandy

1. adjective Excellent; very fine or pleasing. Primarily heard in US. Wow, you've really created a jim-dandy story here! Action, romance, comedy—it's got it all! I'm sure the plan seemed jim-dandy at the time, but you nearly got yourselves killed!
2. noun That which is very fine, pleasing, or excellent. Often used in the phrase "a jim-dandy of a," which can be used sarcastically to imply the opposite. Primarily heard in US. A: "How was your trip to Florida?" B: "Oh boy, it was a jim-dandy! It seemed like everything we did was even better than the last!" The company appears to be gearing up for a jim-dandy of a legal battle over the issue. Sounds like it's going to be a jim-dandy of a party next weekend.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

fine and dandy

nice; good; well. Well, that's just fine and dandy. Couldn't be better. I feel fine and dandy, and I'm going to have a good time here.
See also: and, dandy, fine

jim-dandy

excellent. This is a jim-dandy knife. Where'd you get it? Tom: I'll meet you at six, OK? Charlie: That'll be jim-dandy.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fine and dandy

All right, excellent, as in What you're proposing is fine and dandy with the rest of us. This redundant colloquialism ( fine and dandy both mean "excellent") today is more often used sarcastically in the sense of "not all right" or "bad," as in You don't want to play bridge? Fine and dandy, you've left me without a partner.
See also: and, dandy, fine
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fine and dandy

mod. nice; good; well. (Often sarcastic.) Well, that’s just fine and dandy. Couldn’t be better!
See also: and, dandy, fine
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

fine and dandy

Excellent. This redundant American colloquialism—fine and dandy both mean excellent—today is most often used ironically, for a circumstance that is far from excellent. Originally, however, in the early 1900s, it was stated straightforwardly, as in “‘Has she recovered from her fall?’ ‘Yes, she’s fine and dandy now.’”
See also: and, dandy, fine
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
The half-formed dandyism of students, so depressingly conformist compared to the fin-de-siecle wonders of the last century's turn, so apparently driven by consumerism and branded free advertising, nevertheless confesses itself.
Glick's focus takes in some rather heavily mined seams of gay and lesbian dandyism: from Oscar Wilde through Renee Vivian and Natalie Barney to Radclyffe Hall, Wallace Thurman, William Burroughs, and Andy Warhol.
MP: Dandyism is certainly an interesting proposition for the contemporary environment, especially in thinking of Baudelaire's description of dandies as disenchanted and leisured "outsiders." He also suggests that dandyism appears in periods of transition "when democracy has not yet become all-powerful, and when aristocracy is only partially weakened and discredited." (7) Dandyism is interesting here because it's never about establishing a position outside of society as such, rather to create an inside position of being an "outsider." That's the trick, the X factor.
Her two published books--Rising Star: Dandyism, Gender, and Performance in the Fin de Siecle and Electric Salome: Loie Fuller's Performance of Modernism--examine many aspects of performance in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Europe and America.
and intended for friends who understood the boldness and humor and perhaps even the absurd remoteness of any kind of dandyism from the reality of their daily lives." (244) A Shoemaker's Story challenges us to consider how identities are made, re-made, and contested in and through visual culture, not by isolating photographs from a broader social world of economic reality, but rather by integrating them.
When Lhamon quotes Rice as saying he hoped black dandyism would "discourage the original in whites" the statement seems to speak about abhorrence of Blacks (23).
Miller proposes in an essay on the "black dandy" that precisely because of dandyism's dependence on black and white modernism, the "dandy" figure, with his emphasis on self-fashioning and borrowed style, offers a fruitful way to approach the Harlem Renaissance not as a failed project but as a provocative synthesis of multiple discourses.
While we do not need to talk in terms of "either/or" here, the "blackness" which larrikins embraced by modelling themselves on rough dandyism was more about a decadent style of masculinity, more about participating in legend of the outlaw swell, than it was about racial appropriation.
Team uniforms also contributed to "pretty playing" or simply "looking good." Quite simply, they transformed ballplayers into aesthetic objects, fashioning a sartorial dandyism that valorized self-containment, restraint, and description.(46) Enhancing serious artistic and historical interests, baseball uniforms conceivably borrowed certain theatrical effects from the historically correct costumes of Shakespearean plays; from the eighteenth-century paintings by Peter Lely or Joshua Reynolds; and, from the works of Pre-Raphaelite artists and their derivative fashions.
De Vautre cote, (from the other side) I can also attest to the fact that there is an affect of intellectual snobbery, dandyism, and self-absorption that can attend working with the methods and principles of deconstruction.
At the same time, she suggests, they modified the aristocratic aura of dandyism through their manipulation of popular media forms (41-42).
A similar interest in style was, of course, present in dandyism and decadentism, exemplified in the figure of the artist and his appearance from the bohemian dandy a la Baudelaire and his black neckerchief to the refined elegance of Gabriele D'Annunzio.
Moreover, mal-o-mar (the name is a pun on the marshmallow treat and on Mallarme, the 19th century French poet whose spatially experimental work, Reines explains, is "full of white foam; the marshmallow is his food," and whose dandyism Reines finds politically subversive) gives her the freedom to follow her instincts in pursuing projects other than her own writing (a translation of Baudelaire is in the works).
Robert Sacheli, a columnist for Dandyism.net -- a Web site that has made a mission of reviving what it calls the "Brummellian concept of the dandy as social being, sportsman and urbane philosopher of life" -- has composed a three-part profile of Beebe, part one of which can be found here.