dandy

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Related to dandyish: foppish

fine and dandy

Fine; good. The phrase is often used sarcastically. Sure, Saturday afternoon is fine and dandy—see you then. Well, that's just fine and dandy—my car won't start!
See also: and, dandy, fine

jim-dandy

1. adjective Excellent; very fine or pleasing. Primarily heard in US. Wow, you've really created a jim-dandy story here! Action, romance, comedy—it's got it all! I'm sure the plan seemed jim-dandy at the time, but you nearly got yourselves killed!
2. noun That which is very fine, pleasing, or excellent. Often used in the phrase "a jim-dandy of a," which can be used sarcastically to imply the opposite. Primarily heard in US. A: "How was your trip to Florida?" B: "Oh boy, it was a jim-dandy! It seemed like everything we did was even better than the last!" The company appears to be gearing up for a jim-dandy of a legal battle over the issue. Sounds like it's going to be a jim-dandy of a party next weekend.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

fine and dandy

nice; good; well. Well, that's just fine and dandy. Couldn't be better. I feel fine and dandy, and I'm going to have a good time here.
See also: and, dandy, fine

jim-dandy

excellent. This is a jim-dandy knife. Where'd you get it? Tom: I'll meet you at six, OK? Charlie: That'll be jim-dandy.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fine and dandy

All right, excellent, as in What you're proposing is fine and dandy with the rest of us. This redundant colloquialism ( fine and dandy both mean "excellent") today is more often used sarcastically in the sense of "not all right" or "bad," as in You don't want to play bridge? Fine and dandy, you've left me without a partner.
See also: and, dandy, fine
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fine and dandy

mod. nice; good; well. (Often sarcastic.) Well, that’s just fine and dandy. Couldn’t be better!
See also: and, dandy, fine
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

fine and dandy

Excellent. This redundant American colloquialism—fine and dandy both mean excellent—today is most often used ironically, for a circumstance that is far from excellent. Originally, however, in the early 1900s, it was stated straightforwardly, as in “‘Has she recovered from her fall?’ ‘Yes, she’s fine and dandy now.’”
See also: and, dandy, fine
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
(15) Nowhere is this idea expressed more clearly than in The Picture of Dorian Gray, in which the dandyish protagonist assumes the ageless purity of a work of art while his portrait mirrors his corrupt soul.
I loved the ridiculous posturing by the dandyish mobsters, prancing and making awful jokes and reaching the height of their powers as they attempt to musically seduce three unsuspecting Sisters.
Here, Walker's gangly gesticulations are slowed down and superimposed over images of dandyish nineteenth-century minstrels.
Many of the portraits of figures in the arts included here--such as the actress Ellen Terry, the novelist Henry James, the dandyish stage designer W.
Augustus is decidedly less developed, essentially functioning as a male version of the types of restorative free spirits usually played by Kate Hudson and Kirsten Dunst in Cameron Crowe films, and prone to dandyish flourishes that surely worked better as literary metaphors than visual ones.
FRANCESCA SAYS I love Holmes' erudite, dandyish style coupled with Watson's down-to-earth approach and I was completely sucked in.
The men looked superb in the black frock coats and dandyish white bows of the 1860s, giving us the vitality and style without which a Strauss evening like this falls short of its original intentions.
When he looked around him, Goncourt noticed that his fellow inmates, grim-looking, dandyish, and freshly tonsured for the guillotine, were all doubles of the dead poet.
It adds a dash of colour and flair to your chest area, but make sure you plump for a masculine and non-nonsense fold like the Presidential or the One Point, or you'll end up looking insufferably dandyish.
The queer figures of the male mother, the dandyish fancier, the "obsessive taxonomist" (554), the student of extinct and forgotten species, and the collector of nature's odd variations all allow for a "break from teleological sexuality" and point the way toward "thinking beyond rigid attachment to fixed or immutable forms of embodiment" (569).
Anthony Andrews brought a handsome hauteur to the role of Sebastian Flyte, but he's more dashing than dandyish, and a young Jeremy Irons, who, even at 33 looked quite 47, lacked the necessary zest to make the Oxford days look really believable.
His rival, Lisvana's kidnapper Prince Diego, is the complete opposite of Bredun: a cultivated, dark-haired, dandyish Latin lover, spoiled by Baskarien's sun and courtly pomp but unsuccessful in conquering a woman's heart.
Focusing on the basic contradictions nineteenth-century aestheticism struggled to solve, it gives the attentive reader a shattering insight into the utopian impracticability of dandyish life and is thus, more than any other piece of decadent art, a revealing comment on the illusoriness and deceptiveness of finde-siecle facades and masks.
His use of Lombroso, part serious, part dandyish flaunting of exotic symptoms, again exposes risks in Rondini's approach.