damned

(redirected from damneder)
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(someone or something) be damned

Used to express reckless or contemptuous disregard for a particular person or thing, especially in favor of someone or something else. So, what, you're willing to drag this issue through the courts for God knows how many years, your reputation be damned? The only thing this company is concerned with is making as much money as possible, employee welfare be damned! I'll deliver this package myself if I have to, but it's going to get to their office on time, postal strike be damned!
See also: damned

a (damn) sight better

Quite a lot better (than a different person, thing, or condition). "Damn" is used to emphasize how much better someone or something is. The car should run a damn sight better now that you have the tires aligned properly. So far our new intern has been a sight better than our last one.
See also: better, sight

a (damn) sight less/fewer (something)

Quite a lot less or fewer of something (than someone or something). "Damn" is used to emphasize the degree to which an amount is less/fewer. ("Less" is used when discussing uncountable nouns, while "fewer" is used with countable nouns.) We were much busier than we had expected, so we had a sight fewer staff than we needed. Excuse me, she has a damn sight less experience than I do in this matter, so I'll thank you to refer to me in the future.
See also: less, sight

a (damn) sight more (something)

Quite a lot more of something (than someone or something). "Damn" is used to emphasize this large amount. We'll need a sight more staff working this weekend if we want to deal with the dinner rush. Excuse me, I have a damn sight more experience than you do in this matter.
See also: more, sight

a (damn) sight too (something)

Used to indicate an excessive amount or degree (of something or some quality). "Damn" is used to emphasize this excessiveness. There are a damn sight too many people in this town looking from handouts now that I've struck it rich. Don't you think you're being a sight too strict with the children?
See also: sight

a (damn) sight worse

Quite a lot worse (than a different person, thing, or condition). "Damn" is used to emphasize how much worse someone or something is. Your car is going to run a damn sight worse if your tires remained improperly aligned. So far our new intern has been a sight worse than our last one.
See also: sight, worse

be damned if you do and damned if you don't

To be in a situation in which every action (or inaction) could potentially cause one trouble. So your boss will be mad if you miss the work event, and your husband will be disappointed if you skip your anniversary dinner. Yep, you're damned if you do and damned if you don't!
See also: and, damned, if

damn by association

To condemn, vilify, or discredit someone or something due to an association with a particular person, group, or thing. The multinational corporation was damned by association when it came to light that an employee of one of its subsidiaries belonged to a white supremacist organization. After the terrorist attack, many people were quick to damn by association anyone who belonged to the same faith as the terrorists.
See also: by, damn

damn well

A phrase used to emphasize that someone is definitely going to do something. "Damned well" can also be used. If they have another loud party tonight, I'm damn well calling the cops on them! Unfortunately, she tends to do as she damned well pleases, regardless of the consequences.
See also: damn, well

damned if (one) does and damned if (one) doesn't

Said when one is faced with two undesirable options. I'm damned if I do and damned if I don't—if I confess that I broke the vase, then my parents will be mad, and if I don't, then I'll feel guilty about it. A: "Katie found out that I also asked Colleen to prom. Should I come clean with her?" B: "Man, you are damned if you do and damned if you don't!"
See also: and, damned, does, if

damned if I do and damned if I don't

Every possible action (or inaction) would result in a negative outcome or cause me trouble; there is no course of action that does not have a drawback. My boss will be mad if I miss the work event, and my husband will be disappointed if I skip my anniversary dinner. Yep, I'm damned if I do and damned if I don't!
See also: and, damned, if

damned if I know

An emphatic way of indicating a lack of knowledge about or awareness of something. A: "Is Alex coming tonight?" B: "Damned if I know, he hardly ever talks to me anymore."
See also: damned, if, know

damned if you do and damned if you don't

Every possible action (or inaction) would result in a negative outcome or cause you trouble; there is no course of action that does not have a drawback. So your boss will be mad if you miss the work event, and your husband will be disappointed if you skip your anniversary dinner. Yep, you're damned if you do and damned if you don't!
See also: and, damned, if

damned if you do, damned if you don't

Every possible action (or inaction) would result in a negative outcome or cause you trouble; there is no course of action that does not have a drawback. So your boss will be mad if you miss the work event, and your husband will be disappointed if you skip your anniversary dinner. Damned if you do, damned if you don't!
See also: damned, if

damned sure

Absolutely certain. We'll have our work cut out for us, that's for damned sure! I'm going to make damned sure nothing like this happens again. This is a risky move. You'd better be damned sure it will work.
See also: damned, sure

I'll be damned

An expression of surprise or astonishment, especially regarding some recent revelation. I'll be damned. I never thought I'd see you walk through those doors again. After searching for 20 years, he watched as the bird landed just feet away from him—the bird everyone said was extinct. "I'll be damned," he whispered to himself.
See also: damned

I'll be damned if I (do something)

I am determined not to do something. I'll be damned if I let some young upstart like you take control of my company!
See also: damned, if

I'm be damned if I (do something)

rude slang I am determined not to do something. I'm be damned if I let some young upstart like you take control of my company!
See also: damned, if

that's for damned sure

That is absolutely certain; that's the truth. We'll have our work cut out for us, that's for damned sure! A: "I'm sorry, boss. It won't happen again." B: "Well that's for damned sure, otherwise you're fired!"
See also: damned, sure
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Damned if you do, damned if you don't.

Prov. No matter what you do, it will cause trouble. If I use this money to pay the rent, I won't have enough left over for food. But if I don't use the money to pay the rent, my landlord will evict me. Damned if I do, damned if I don't. Helen: If I invite Shirley to the party, I'm sure she'll get drunk and make an unpleasant scene. But if I don't invite her, she'll never forgive me. Jane: Damned if you do, damned if you don't, huh?
See also: damned, if

I'm damned if I do and damned if I don't.

Fig. There are problems if I do something and problems if I don't do it. I can't win. I'm damned if I do and damned if I don't. No matter whether I go or stay, I am in trouble. I'm damned if I do and damned if I don't.
See also: and, damned, if
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

damned if I do, damned if I don't

A situation in which one can't win. For example, If I invite Aunt Jane, Mother will be angry, and if I don't, I lose Jane's friendship-I'm damned if I do and damned if I don't . Eric Partridge suggested this idiom may have come from the emphatic I'm damned if I do, meaning "I definitely will not do something," but despite the similar wording the quite different meaning argues against this theory. [Colloquial; first half of 1900s] Also see catch-22.
See also: damned, if

damn well

Also, damned well. Certainly, without doubt; emphatically. For example, You damn well better improve your grades, or I know damned well that he's leaving me out. The damn in this phrase is mainly an intensifier.
See also: damn, well
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

be damned if you do and damned if you don't

When people say that you will be damned if you do and damned if you don't, they mean that whatever you choose to do in a situation, you will be criticized. When it comes to interfering in other countries, when you're the world's most powerful nation, you're damned if you do and damned if you don't.
See also: and, damned, if
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

damned if you do and damned if you don't

in some situations whatever you do is likely to attract criticism.
1998 Spectator Some of the media were critical of the photo…That did not stop them all running it on the front page. You're damned if you do and damned if you don't.
See also: and, damned, if
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

I’ll be ˈdamned

(old-fashioned, spoken) used for expressing surprise: Well, I’ll be damned! Isn’t that Sarah Parker over there?
See also: damned

I’m/I’ll be ˈdamned if...

(British English also I’m/I’ll be ˈblowed if ...) (spoken) I certainly will not, do not, etc: I’m damned if I will lend any money to that lazy son of mine.‘Why is she so late?’ ‘I’ll be blowed if I know.’
See also: damned
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

Damned if I know

and DIIN and DIIK
phr. & comp. abb. I don’t know.; I have no idea. (DIIN is for poor spellers.) Don’t ask me! DIIK.
See also: damned, if, know
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

damn well

Without any doubt; positively: I am damn well going to file charges against him.
See also: damn, well
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

damned if I/you/they do, damned if I/you don't

Acting or not acting are equally harmful, an insoluble dilemma. This expression dates from the first half of the 1900s, and thus is older than the synonymous catch-22. For example, “If I tell Harry I’m going to John’s party and he’s not invited, both he and John will be furious—I’m damned if I do and damned if I don’t.”
See also: damned, if
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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