damn the torpedoes, full steam ahead

damn the torpedoes

To press on with a task or current course of action regardless of apparent risks or dangers. Attributed to David Farragut of the United States Navy during the American Civil War, usually paraphrased as "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!" The actual order (if it ever existed) was: "Damn the torpedoes! Four bells. Captain Drayton, go ahead! Jouett, full speed!" I don't care that it might bankrupt the company! Damn the torpedoes and get it done already!
See also: damn, torpedo

damn the torpedoes, full steam ahead

Proceed at once, no matter what. This cliché is a quotation of Admiral David Glasgow Farragut’s order during the Civil War, at the battle of Mobile Bay (August 5, 1864). It has been repeated ever since, under a variety of circumstances. Thus, the novelist Robert Ludlum used it in Apocalypse Watch (1995): “If this administration can root out the Nazi influence . . . It’s damn the torpedoes, full steam ahead.” Similarly, Nevada Barr used it in Burn (2010): “Your definition of ‘careful’ is vaguely analogous to most people’s definition of ‘damn the torpedoes.’”
See also: ahead, damn, full, steam
References in periodicals archive ?
Consider the heroic utterance, "Damn the torpedoes, full steam ahead." Rear Admiral David Farragut said, or more likely shouted, this or something like it as he led the Union fleet through Mobile Bay during the Civil War.
At home, it would be "Damn the torpedoes, full steam ahead!" If you're going to do something, then do it.