cut (someone or something) loose

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cut (someone or something) loose

1. To end a personal or professional relationship with someone, often abruptly. A: "Wait, they fired you?" B: "Yes! They just cut me loose with no explanation!" If he keeps calling me at all hours of the night, I'm going to have to cut him loose, I mean it!
2. To free or remove someone or something from something, often by literally cutting. Luckily, the rescue crew was able to cut the girl loose from her wrecked car and save her life. When the hook got caught on the net, we had to cut it loose.
See also: cut, loose

cut loose

1. To behave in a relaxed or uninhibited manner. Come on, we're on vacation—it's time to cut loose!
2. To leave a particular place or area. The robbers cut loose when they heard the approaching sirens.
3. To leave or separate from someone or something. We need to cut loose from that guy before his scandalous behavior becomes public knowledge. Come on, you're 18 now—it's time to cut loose and go to college.
4. To relinquish or release something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "cut" and "loose." That technology is so outdated now that we should really cut it loose.
See also: cut, loose
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

cut loose

(with something) Go to let go (with something).
See also: cut, loose
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cut loose

1. Speak or act without restraint, as in He cut loose with a string of curses. [Early 1800s]
2. Leave, clear out, as in Let's cut loose right now. [Slang; 1960s]
See also: cut, loose
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cut loose

INFORMAL
1. If someone cuts loose, they start to behave in excited or uncontrolled way. This is the guy who cut loose live on breakfast radio during an outdoor concert at a Brisbane university.
2. If you cut loose, you spend time relaxing and enjoying yourself. We got through to lunch and in the afternoon were able to cut loose.
See also: cut, loose

cut someone/something loose

COMMON If you cut a person or organization loose, you get rid of them, especially by no longer employing them or controlling them. The company is about to be cut loose from the state on which it has so long depended. He could not believe that the firm he has served for so long would cut him loose. Note: You can also say that a person or an organization cuts loose if they become free from the influence or authority of other people. He's cut loose from this business except, possibly, where James is concerned.
See also: cut, loose, someone, something
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

cut loose

1 distance yourself from a person, group, or system by which you are unduly influenced or on which you are over-dependent. 2 begin to act without restraint. informal
1 1993 Isidore Okpewho Tides When the time comes that I feel my friends are not sufficiently behind me in what I'm trying to do, I'm going to cut loose from them.
See also: cut, loose
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

cut loose

in. to let go; to become independent; to grow up and leave home. It was hard to cut loose from home.
See also: cut, loose
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

cut loose

To speak or act without restraint: cut loose with a string of curses.
See also: cut, loose
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mindful of the wet conditions, the Coventry side gave their visitors a lesson in ten-man rugby before cutting loose in the last few minutes.
The rest of the program happily focused on pure dancing, with guest artist Juan Ogalla cutting loose in an extended improvised solo highlighting his compact intensity and sharp, combative heelwork.
Bellows" cutting loose with notes unheard of this side of a hyena kill, with the boy evidently anticipating the spectacle of her tonsils flying out at any moment.
One would expect jazz music about water to be flowing and supple, but many of these pieces seem stiff and formal, with even the moments of "cutting loose" seeming too carefully scripted.
"At the time, Harvester was in big trouble, sinking faster than the Titanic, cutting loose operations like ours in a desperate attempt to stay afloat.
Last December, Coalition leaders approved a major reorganization, firing almost one fifth of its 110 staff members, shutting down its flagship publication, Christian American, and cutting loose its minority outreach project.