cut corners

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Related to cutting corners: take care of, up for grabs, on a roll, give it a shot

cut corners

To skip certain steps in order to do something as easily or cheaply as possible, usually to the detriment of the finished product or end result. Don't cut corners on this project—it has to be done thoroughly, no matter the cost. If you cut corners and don't apply a top coat, then your nails probably are going to chip faster.
See also: corner, cut

cut corners

Fig. to take shortcuts; to save money or effort by finding cheaper or easier ways to do something. They're always finding ways to cut corners. I won't cut corners just to save money. I put quality first.
See also: corner, cut

cut corners

Do something in the easiest or least expensive way; also, act illegally. For example, Cutting corners in production led to a definite loss in product quality, or If the accountant cuts corners the auditors are sure to find out. This term alludes to rounding a corner as closely as possible in order to shorten the distance traversed and/or save time. [Late 1800s]
See also: corner, cut

cut corners

COMMON If you cut corners, you save time, money, or effort by not following the correct procedure or rules for doing something. Don't try to cut corners as you'll only be making work for yourself later on. He accused the Home Office of trying to save money by cutting corners on security. Note: You can call this activity corner cutting. It's precisely this sort of corner cutting that causes the problems. Corner-cutting contractors build tiny classrooms and narrow corridors.
See also: corner, cut

cut corners

undertake something in what appears to be the easiest, quickest, or cheapest way, often by omitting to do something important or ignoring rules.
This phrase comes from cutting (off) the corner , which means ‘taking the shortest course by going across and not round a corner’.
See also: corner, cut

cut ˈcorners

(disapproving) do things in the easiest, quickest or cheapest way and not in the proper way: Don’t be tempted to cut corners when doing a home decorating job.
See also: corner, cut

cut corners

tv. to do something more easily; to take shortcuts; to save money by finding cheaper ways to do something. (As if one were speeding somewhere and took the shortest way possible through intersections, i.e., by making left turns that cut across oncoming traffic lanes.) I won’t cut corners just to save money. I put quality first.
See also: corner, cut

cut corners

To do something in the easiest or most inexpensive way.
See also: corner, cut

cut corners, to

To do a hasty, slipshod job; also, to act illegally. The term comes from using a direct route that omits corners or from moving very fast and rounding turns very closely. It dates from about the middle of the nineteenth century. Mark Twain used it in Innocents Abroad (1869): “He cuts a corner so closely now and then . . . that I feel myself ‘scooching.’”
See also: cut
References in periodicals archive ?
The idea of cutting corners usually comes up when there is some kind of time or financial crunch, and the shortcut looks like a possible solution to whatever problem is currently at the top of the list.
'When we go back to work, we will not be doing more overtime to cover the workload or cutting corners. We will work exactly to the rules that have been set out to us.'
They cut out all the unnecessary waste and expense - without cutting corners but still concentrating on the key tools that are the most cost efficient at selling houses.
The article also quotes the president of the Alliance as saying that "the city's new building code should improve safety instead of cutting corners." The reference is to an initiative of the Mayor's Model Code Task Force that is working to put in place new construction regulations based upon the International Building Code and elements of other model codes in use around the nation.
Failure to manage stress, cutting corners to save money on safety and not reporting accidents are just a few of the most common errors.
United are the world's richest club and didn't become so by cutting corners as they became a soccer superpower.
If somebody has been deliberately been cutting corners they should be arrested, charged and jailed for risking our health and our livelihoods.
'I think that is the only way they would stop cutting corners. This is too important an issue not to take tougher action.' Mike Jones, father-of-two and a parent governor of Millbank Primary in Ely, Cardiff, said: 'I do not think it is right to cause unnecessary panic.
The report also found that those in their thirties and forties were also cutting corners with their insurance, with 28 per cent taking out minimum cover to get their premiums down and 16 per cent not updating their policy to reflect new purchases such as electrical equipment or jewellery.
The report also found that those in their 30s and 40s were also cutting corners with their insurance, with 28 per cent taking out minimum cover to get their premiums down and 16 per cent not updating their policy to reflect new purchases such as electrical equipment or jewellery.
Research by car care specialists Comma shows one in 20 of us admit to cutting corners to clear a windscreen.
I'm not cutting corners on the divorce - I know how my dad would want it done.
How often do we justify cutting corners in the name of business?