cut corners

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Related to cutting corners: take care of, up for grabs, on a roll, give it a shot

cut corners

To skip certain steps in order to do something as easily or cheaply as possible, usually to the detriment of the finished product or end result. Don't cut corners on this project—it has to be done thoroughly, no matter the cost. If you cut corners and don't apply a top coat, then your nails probably are going to chip faster.
See also: corner, cut

cut corners

Fig. to take shortcuts; to save money or effort by finding cheaper or easier ways to do something. They're always finding ways to cut corners. I won't cut corners just to save money. I put quality first.
See also: corner, cut

cut corners

Do something in the easiest or least expensive way; also, act illegally. For example, Cutting corners in production led to a definite loss in product quality, or If the accountant cuts corners the auditors are sure to find out. This term alludes to rounding a corner as closely as possible in order to shorten the distance traversed and/or save time. [Late 1800s]
See also: corner, cut

cut corners

COMMON If you cut corners, you save time, money, or effort by not following the correct procedure or rules for doing something. Don't try to cut corners as you'll only be making work for yourself later on. He accused the Home Office of trying to save money by cutting corners on security. Note: You can call this activity corner cutting. It's precisely this sort of corner cutting that causes the problems. Corner-cutting contractors build tiny classrooms and narrow corridors.
See also: corner, cut

cut corners

undertake something in what appears to be the easiest, quickest, or cheapest way, often by omitting to do something important or ignoring rules.
This phrase comes from cutting (off) the corner , which means ‘taking the shortest course by going across and not round a corner’.
See also: corner, cut

cut ˈcorners

(disapproving) do things in the easiest, quickest or cheapest way and not in the proper way: Don’t be tempted to cut corners when doing a home decorating job.
See also: corner, cut

cut corners

tv. to do something more easily; to take shortcuts; to save money by finding cheaper ways to do something. (As if one were speeding somewhere and took the shortest way possible through intersections, i.e., by making left turns that cut across oncoming traffic lanes.) I won’t cut corners just to save money. I put quality first.
See also: corner, cut

cut corners

To do something in the easiest or most inexpensive way.
See also: corner, cut
References in periodicals archive ?
Common sense says that cutting corners will increase the risks that something will go wrong, some problem will surface, or something will be missed.
Robert Jordan, chairman of lettings agents Jordan's and a past president of the Association of Residential Letting Agents (ARLA), said: "Ensuring the safety of the tenant should be the number one priority for landlords and managing agents , but some still insist on cutting corners to save money, putting people's lives at risk.
Kathy Gaffney, secretary of West Midlands Hazards Trust, said the credit crunch could lead to firms cutting corners and putting workers lives at risk as she remembered the thousands killed or injured at work.
Findings from the Government-backed scheme revealed a nation keen on cutting corners by using "mates rates" rather than focusing on getting a quality job done.
They cut out all the unnecessary waste and expense - without cutting corners but still concentrating on the key tools that are the most cost efficient at selling houses.
The article also quotes the president of the Alliance as saying that "the city's new building code should improve safety instead of cutting corners.
Titanic arch-villain Billy Zane, 32, who will play Mark Antony, added: "There was no cutting corners here.
Keep in mind that cutting corners might compromise product safety, which is especially important with children's items.
The report also found that those in their thirties and forties were also cutting corners with their insurance, with 28 per cent taking out minimum cover to get their premiums down and 16 per cent not updating their policy to reflect new purchases such as electrical equipment or jewellery.
Both were unrestricted free agents in a sport that is cutting corners with the possibility of a work stoppage before next season.
And Alex Salmond, MP for Banff and Buchan, said: "It is not a question of fishermen cutting corners, but economic pressure making what is a dangerous industry even more unsafe.
We are not interested in using the cheapest products, or cutting corners.
It's coming to an end now but I will take note about what she is saying about not cutting corners because we are being pushed to do that but it wouldn't help us financially.